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Editors’ Note

Editors’ Note EDITORS’ NOTES The digital humanities is experiencing significant growth and, for the first time, is attracting attention from the mainstream media. Over the past several months, the New York Times, for example, has featured periodic stories on the use of computing and Web technologies by humanists. One story focused on a debate that has engaged Anglo-American scholars for a number of years, namely, whether a Republic of Letters existed during the European Enlightenment and, if so, whether it influenced the collapse of the ancien regime. The Republic of Letters is the name given to the regular exchange of letters among intellectuals of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries on important philosophical issues of the day, including the role of government and the rights of individuals. This transnational and transcultural community included key figures in the development of ideas used by revolutionaries in America and France, but to what extent was it a true network of correspondents? Using a “Digging into Data” grant funded jointly by the National Endowment for the Humanities, a U.S. funding agency, and the Joint Information Services Committee, a British funder, a team of UK-US scholars, led by Dan Edelstein, an associate professor of French and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing Edinburgh University Press

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press and the Association for History and Computing 2011
Subject
Historical Studies
ISSN
1753-8548
eISSN
1755-1706
DOI
10.3366/ijhac.2011.0016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

EDITORS’ NOTES The digital humanities is experiencing significant growth and, for the first time, is attracting attention from the mainstream media. Over the past several months, the New York Times, for example, has featured periodic stories on the use of computing and Web technologies by humanists. One story focused on a debate that has engaged Anglo-American scholars for a number of years, namely, whether a Republic of Letters existed during the European Enlightenment and, if so, whether it influenced the collapse of the ancien regime. The Republic of Letters is the name given to the regular exchange of letters among intellectuals of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries on important philosophical issues of the day, including the role of government and the rights of individuals. This transnational and transcultural community included key figures in the development of ideas used by revolutionaries in America and France, but to what extent was it a true network of correspondents? Using a “Digging into Data” grant funded jointly by the National Endowment for the Humanities, a U.S. funding agency, and the Joint Information Services Committee, a British funder, a team of UK-US scholars, led by Dan Edelstein, an associate professor of French and

Journal

International Journal of Humanities and Arts ComputingEdinburgh University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2011

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