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Editors' Note

Editors' Note This past July we marked the centenary of the beginning of a global conflict that reshaped Europe (and much of the world as well). The Great War or World War, or the European War as it was known at first in the United States, and latterly World War One or the First World War, has as many names as it does possible interpretation of events. Over the last century with the benefits of hindsight we can see the ebb and flow of historiographical debates concerning the cause, outcome, and conduct of the war. It is interesting to see that a particular theory can achieve near-universal acceptance only be undermined and discounted over following decades. There can be little doubt that the humanities will pay much attention over the next decade to the war, although at present we cannot foresee the paths that this research will take. Significantly, the digital humanities has the opportunity to serve this renewed scholarly and public interest at many levels. First, there is a chance to supplement current research content from hitherto undiscovered community sources. No doubt many objects relating to war--bayonets, medals, early respirators, and probably the occasional handgun or riffle--will be uncovered. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing Edinburgh University Press

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2014
Subject
Historical Studies
ISSN
1753-8548
eISSN
1755-1706
DOI
10.3366/ijhac.2014.0125
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This past July we marked the centenary of the beginning of a global conflict that reshaped Europe (and much of the world as well). The Great War or World War, or the European War as it was known at first in the United States, and latterly World War One or the First World War, has as many names as it does possible interpretation of events. Over the last century with the benefits of hindsight we can see the ebb and flow of historiographical debates concerning the cause, outcome, and conduct of the war. It is interesting to see that a particular theory can achieve near-universal acceptance only be undermined and discounted over following decades. There can be little doubt that the humanities will pay much attention over the next decade to the war, although at present we cannot foresee the paths that this research will take. Significantly, the digital humanities has the opportunity to serve this renewed scholarly and public interest at many levels. First, there is a chance to supplement current research content from hitherto undiscovered community sources. No doubt many objects relating to war--bayonets, medals, early respirators, and probably the occasional handgun or riffle--will be uncovered.

Journal

International Journal of Humanities and Arts ComputingEdinburgh University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2014

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