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Editors’ Note

Editors’ Note Almost alone among major newspapers, the New York Times continues to write on what is happening in the digital humanities under the series rubric, Humanities 2.0. It is a heartening development because the marriage of computing technologies and the humanities within the Web 2.0 environment is otherwise an underreported story. The most recent Times story focused on the spatial humanities (‘With digital mapmaking, scholars see history’, http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/27/arts/geographic-informationsystems-help-scholars-see-history.html?ref=patriciacohen). Geographic information science and its associated tool, GIS, are reshaping the way we think about traditional questions and problems within the humanities. The result is a reinvigoration of an older approach associated with the Annalesschool, but it also is far more. It is, in brief, a development that promises a unique postmodern, immersive, and experiential scholarship to stand alongside the rational and argumentative framework favoured by humanists since the Enlightenment. We are not there yet, of course, but every week we receive essays that suggest how rapidly we are embracing the tools and architecture of the digital humanities. This issue, for example, has an article on how GIS has been used to analyse nineteenth-century performance culture. Another piece explores the potential (and limitations) for virtual research environments (VREs) in making humanities http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing Edinburgh University Press

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press and the Association for History and Computing 2011
Subject
Historical Studies
ISSN
1753-8548
eISSN
1755-1706
DOI
10.3366/ijhac.2011.0025
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Almost alone among major newspapers, the New York Times continues to write on what is happening in the digital humanities under the series rubric, Humanities 2.0. It is a heartening development because the marriage of computing technologies and the humanities within the Web 2.0 environment is otherwise an underreported story. The most recent Times story focused on the spatial humanities (‘With digital mapmaking, scholars see history’, http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/27/arts/geographic-informationsystems-help-scholars-see-history.html?ref=patriciacohen). Geographic information science and its associated tool, GIS, are reshaping the way we think about traditional questions and problems within the humanities. The result is a reinvigoration of an older approach associated with the Annalesschool, but it also is far more. It is, in brief, a development that promises a unique postmodern, immersive, and experiential scholarship to stand alongside the rational and argumentative framework favoured by humanists since the Enlightenment. We are not there yet, of course, but every week we receive essays that suggest how rapidly we are embracing the tools and architecture of the digital humanities. This issue, for example, has an article on how GIS has been used to analyse nineteenth-century performance culture. Another piece explores the potential (and limitations) for virtual research environments (VREs) in making humanities

Journal

International Journal of Humanities and Arts ComputingEdinburgh University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2011

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