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Editorial

Editorial Samantha Murray and Nikki Sullivan The second issue of the Somatechnics journal stands as a testament to the critical potential of somatechnics as a mode of inquiry. The contributors to this general issue represent a wide-ranging variety of disciplinary perspectives, including documentary filmmaking, visual art, medical humanities, philosophy, communication technologies and critical theory. The papers collected herein cover diverse terrain, all demonstrating – across a myriad of lived phenomena – the ways in which embodiment is always already technologised, and indeed the ways technologies are always enfleshed. In her paper, Janet Merewether reflects on her experiences of making a documentary focused on the life of dominatrix with a life-threatening genetic disorder. Morgan Holmes explores the implications of a nomenclature of ‘disorder’ around intersex, and the ways in which recent changes to clinical language has produced problematic embodied effects. Also investigating intersexed embodiment, Jessica Robyn Cadwallader critically examines the surgical interventions into intersexed bodies, and illustrates the ways such interventions memorialise sexual dimorphism whilst forgetting the gifts of the ‘ambiguous’ other. Debra Bergoffen engages with the ambiguity that marks what we understand as ‘human rights’, and the possibilities for securing justice for the vulnerable body. In and through a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Somatechnics Edinburgh University Press

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press
Subject
Film, Media and Cultural Studies
ISSN
2044-0138
eISSN
2044-0146
DOI
10.3366/soma.2011.0018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Samantha Murray and Nikki Sullivan The second issue of the Somatechnics journal stands as a testament to the critical potential of somatechnics as a mode of inquiry. The contributors to this general issue represent a wide-ranging variety of disciplinary perspectives, including documentary filmmaking, visual art, medical humanities, philosophy, communication technologies and critical theory. The papers collected herein cover diverse terrain, all demonstrating – across a myriad of lived phenomena – the ways in which embodiment is always already technologised, and indeed the ways technologies are always enfleshed. In her paper, Janet Merewether reflects on her experiences of making a documentary focused on the life of dominatrix with a life-threatening genetic disorder. Morgan Holmes explores the implications of a nomenclature of ‘disorder’ around intersex, and the ways in which recent changes to clinical language has produced problematic embodied effects. Also investigating intersexed embodiment, Jessica Robyn Cadwallader critically examines the surgical interventions into intersexed bodies, and illustrates the ways such interventions memorialise sexual dimorphism whilst forgetting the gifts of the ‘ambiguous’ other. Debra Bergoffen engages with the ambiguity that marks what we understand as ‘human rights’, and the possibilities for securing justice for the vulnerable body. In and through a

Journal

SomatechnicsEdinburgh University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2011

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