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Editorial

Editorial Journal of Social and Political Philosophy 2.2 (2023): v DOI: 10.3366/jspp.2023.0052 © Edinburgh University Press www.euppublishing.com/jspp The current issue demonstrates JSPP’s commitment to a wide range of subject matter, with articles on Just War theory; Lukács and Foucault; the Convergence Conception of Political Liberalism; the nature of the public sphere; and the current state of Left Libertarianism. However, the defining characteristic of this issue is originality in relation to the subject matters discussed. Elisabeth Forster and Isaac Taylor argue, with reference to the historical example of warlord wars in China during the early twentieth century, that Just War theory may be self-defeating to the extent that it makes it more difficult for combatants to end wars that they suppose to be just. Sakari Säynäjoki and Tuomo Tiisala discuss a hitherto unremarked commonality between Lukács and Foucault, based on their respective uses of the neo-Kantian conception of the a priori conditions of experience as historical and therefore revisable. Their argument has wide-ranging implications for the understanding of these two thinkers and for critical social and political thought more generally. Saranga Sudarshan argues that the convergence conception of Political Liberalism faces an as-yet unnoticed problem that arises from a tension between its account of the nature of convergent agreements and the issue- and context-specific rules that are supposed to be the object of those agreements. Chris Henry and Iain Mackenzie identify problems with existing accounts of the changing nature of the public sphere before proposing a novel approach informed by Gilbert Simondon’s non-hylomorphic account of individuation. Finally, in a comprehensive survey that he presents as a kind of manifesto, Mark Reiff explains what is new in Left Libertarianism and how it deserves to be considered a distinctive approach in political philosophy, one that contains useful resources to assist liberal egalitarian efforts to create a more just society. We are also delighted to publish a Review Symposium on Philip Pettit’s The State (Princeton 2023), a highly original functional genealogy of the state that is sure to become a focus of philosophical analysis. Finally, this issue includes reviews of two significant books dealing with political philosophy in East Asia: Machiavelli in Northeast Asia edited by Jun- Hyeok Kwak (Routledge 2022) and Tao Jiang’s Origins of Moral-Political Philosophy in Early China (Oxford 2021). The contributors to the Review Symposium and the book reviews demonstrate our continuing effort to promote engagement between Western and East Asian social and political thought. Paul Patton http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Social and Political Philosophy Edinburgh University Press

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2752-7514
eISSN
2752-7522
DOI
10.3366/jspp.2023.0052
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Journal of Social and Political Philosophy 2.2 (2023): v DOI: 10.3366/jspp.2023.0052 © Edinburgh University Press www.euppublishing.com/jspp The current issue demonstrates JSPP’s commitment to a wide range of subject matter, with articles on Just War theory; Lukács and Foucault; the Convergence Conception of Political Liberalism; the nature of the public sphere; and the current state of Left Libertarianism. However, the defining characteristic of this issue is originality in relation to the subject matters discussed. Elisabeth Forster and Isaac Taylor argue, with reference to the historical example of warlord wars in China during the early twentieth century, that Just War theory may be self-defeating to the extent that it makes it more difficult for combatants to end wars that they suppose to be just. Sakari Säynäjoki and Tuomo Tiisala discuss a hitherto unremarked commonality between Lukács and Foucault, based on their respective uses of the neo-Kantian conception of the a priori conditions of experience as historical and therefore revisable. Their argument has wide-ranging implications for the understanding of these two thinkers and for critical social and political thought more generally. Saranga Sudarshan argues that the convergence conception of Political Liberalism faces an as-yet unnoticed problem that arises from a tension between its account of the nature of convergent agreements and the issue- and context-specific rules that are supposed to be the object of those agreements. Chris Henry and Iain Mackenzie identify problems with existing accounts of the changing nature of the public sphere before proposing a novel approach informed by Gilbert Simondon’s non-hylomorphic account of individuation. Finally, in a comprehensive survey that he presents as a kind of manifesto, Mark Reiff explains what is new in Left Libertarianism and how it deserves to be considered a distinctive approach in political philosophy, one that contains useful resources to assist liberal egalitarian efforts to create a more just society. We are also delighted to publish a Review Symposium on Philip Pettit’s The State (Princeton 2023), a highly original functional genealogy of the state that is sure to become a focus of philosophical analysis. Finally, this issue includes reviews of two significant books dealing with political philosophy in East Asia: Machiavelli in Northeast Asia edited by Jun- Hyeok Kwak (Routledge 2022) and Tao Jiang’s Origins of Moral-Political Philosophy in Early China (Oxford 2021). The contributors to the Review Symposium and the book reviews demonstrate our continuing effort to promote engagement between Western and East Asian social and political thought. Paul Patton

Journal

Journal of Social and Political PhilosophyEdinburgh University Press

Published: Aug 1, 2023

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