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Editorial

Editorial Holly Eva Katherine Randell-Moon This special issue of Somatechnics examines what monsters do both in methodology and meaning-making practices. Traversing disciplinary fields and practices such as bioart, speech theory, philosophy, and media, the issue is a collective exploration of the ways monsters figure and are figured in historical and contemporary social and political imaginaries. The monster’s constitution through discursive and material technologies and their historically specific application to bodies and matter, make the issue particularly suited to Somatechnics. Indeed, the monster exemplifies somatechnics (as a methodology and meaning- making practice) par excellence. My first encounter with (the then unformed field of inquiry that later became reified as) somatechnics, was Susan Stryker’s seminal essay, ‘My Words to Victor Frankenstein Above the Village of Chamounix: Performing Transgender Rage’. In this essay, Stryker poignantly notes the violent effects of the attribution of monstrity to queer and in particular, transgender subjects. It is also a powerful monologue on the silencing of rage and anger expressed by minoritised subjects. Empathy with Frankenstein’s creature has formed the basis of a number of influential readings and creative works inspired by Shelley’s novel (including work contained in this special issue). Recently, a tone-deaf piece appeared in the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Somatechnics Edinburgh University Press

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2044-0138
eISSN
2044-0146
DOI
10.3366/soma.2018.0246
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Holly Eva Katherine Randell-Moon This special issue of Somatechnics examines what monsters do both in methodology and meaning-making practices. Traversing disciplinary fields and practices such as bioart, speech theory, philosophy, and media, the issue is a collective exploration of the ways monsters figure and are figured in historical and contemporary social and political imaginaries. The monster’s constitution through discursive and material technologies and their historically specific application to bodies and matter, make the issue particularly suited to Somatechnics. Indeed, the monster exemplifies somatechnics (as a methodology and meaning- making practice) par excellence. My first encounter with (the then unformed field of inquiry that later became reified as) somatechnics, was Susan Stryker’s seminal essay, ‘My Words to Victor Frankenstein Above the Village of Chamounix: Performing Transgender Rage’. In this essay, Stryker poignantly notes the violent effects of the attribution of monstrity to queer and in particular, transgender subjects. It is also a powerful monologue on the silencing of rage and anger expressed by minoritised subjects. Empathy with Frankenstein’s creature has formed the basis of a number of influential readings and creative works inspired by Shelley’s novel (including work contained in this special issue). Recently, a tone-deaf piece appeared in the

Journal

SomatechnicsEdinburgh University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2018

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