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Editor's Note

Editor's Note Building machine-readable data, making it available and reusable has been a goal of digital humanities researchers for quite some time. Given that humanities data is usually not readily available, but has to be digitized in often elaborate – and thus costly – enterprises, it would make sense to share data with other scholars in order to make data sets accessible, reusable and sustainable. The difficulties that arose were due to the plurality of database technologies and data models, or simply due to the intrinsic nature of arts and humanities data sets requiring bespoke solutions; making it hard to establish interoperability and resulting in data sets becoming ‘silos’: disconnected data that could be stored as a static set but could not be made to ‘talk’ to other data sets. Since at least 2006, solutions have been proposed to prevent this data from becoming silos, even when shared on the Internet. The ‘Linked Open Data’ (LOD) initiative uses established concepts from Semantic Web technologies to define a least common denominator, a set of best practices, to share and link data across platforms. Issues remain, such as technical sustainability (there is often no funding available for researchers to keep their data online http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of social_sciences_and_humanities and Arts Computing Edinburgh University Press

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
1753-8548
eISSN
1755-1706
DOI
10.3366/ijhac.2022.0280
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Building machine-readable data, making it available and reusable has been a goal of digital humanities researchers for quite some time. Given that humanities data is usually not readily available, but has to be digitized in often elaborate – and thus costly – enterprises, it would make sense to share data with other scholars in order to make data sets accessible, reusable and sustainable. The difficulties that arose were due to the plurality of database technologies and data models, or simply due to the intrinsic nature of arts and humanities data sets requiring bespoke solutions; making it hard to establish interoperability and resulting in data sets becoming ‘silos’: disconnected data that could be stored as a static set but could not be made to ‘talk’ to other data sets. Since at least 2006, solutions have been proposed to prevent this data from becoming silos, even when shared on the Internet. The ‘Linked Open Data’ (LOD) initiative uses established concepts from Semantic Web technologies to define a least common denominator, a set of best practices, to share and link data across platforms. Issues remain, such as technical sustainability (there is often no funding available for researchers to keep their data online

Journal

International Journal of social_sciences_and_humanities and Arts ComputingEdinburgh University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2022

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