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Early Planning at Abbotsford, 1811–12: Walter Scott, William Stark and the Cottage that Never Was

Early Planning at Abbotsford, 1811–12: Walter Scott, William Stark and the Cottage that Never Was Michael Buck and Peter Garside The significance of Sir Walter Scott's Abbotsford as an important nineteenthcentury manor house in the Scottish `Baronial' style is rarely contested. The complexity of the property's development, however, has left open important questions about its history. In the main, previous studies of Abbotsford have shown a slow evolution from the original farmhouse on the estate through several stages until the main structure as it existed in Scott's lifetime was completed in 1825. What has now become more clearly visible, however, is the fact that for at least the first year after the purchase of the property in June 1811 Scott was aiming to build his residence on fresh ground immediately adjacent to the Tweed, according to plans commissioned from the eminent Glasgow architect William Stark. Using a range of archival material from the period ­ some newly discovered ­ this paper traces Scott's plan to build his `cottage' by the Tweed, from the inception of the scheme in the summer of 1811 until its effectual abandonment after 1812. On 20 June 1811 Walter Scott accepted Dr Robert Douglas's formal offer for the sale of the lands of Newarthaugh, the original part of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

Early Planning at Abbotsford, 1811–12: Walter Scott, William Stark and the Cottage that Never Was

Architectural Heritage , Volume 24 (1): 41 – Nov 1, 2013

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© The Architectural Heritage Society of Scotland, 2013
Subject
Historical Studies
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2013.0045
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Michael Buck and Peter Garside The significance of Sir Walter Scott's Abbotsford as an important nineteenthcentury manor house in the Scottish `Baronial' style is rarely contested. The complexity of the property's development, however, has left open important questions about its history. In the main, previous studies of Abbotsford have shown a slow evolution from the original farmhouse on the estate through several stages until the main structure as it existed in Scott's lifetime was completed in 1825. What has now become more clearly visible, however, is the fact that for at least the first year after the purchase of the property in June 1811 Scott was aiming to build his residence on fresh ground immediately adjacent to the Tweed, according to plans commissioned from the eminent Glasgow architect William Stark. Using a range of archival material from the period ­ some newly discovered ­ this paper traces Scott's plan to build his `cottage' by the Tweed, from the inception of the scheme in the summer of 1811 until its effectual abandonment after 1812. On 20 June 1811 Walter Scott accepted Dr Robert Douglas's formal offer for the sale of the lands of Newarthaugh, the original part of the

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2013

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