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Customary Arbitration in Nigeria: Development and Prospects

Customary Arbitration in Nigeria: Development and Prospects OLUBAYO OLUDURO∗ I. INTRODUCTION Conflicts among human beings are as old as life itself and will always exist. Conflict can exist on many different levels, including international, intragroup, intergroup, interpersonal and intrapersonal. It can exist about different subject matters – ideals or beliefs, values, materials and resources, emotions, roles and responsibilities.1 Conflicts vary in terms of the social contexts in which they are located (two old friends, family members, neighbours, strangers, consumers and merchants, distant nation states); in the time span in which they are located (one-off or one-shot encounters and conflicts, long-standing or embedded conflicts, temporary or repeated conflicts in ongoing relationships like families and employment settings); and even within the same social environment or subject matter in the way in which the disputants treat the conflict, in the strategies, tactics and behaviours they employ (avoidance, self-help, peaceful negotiation, argument, escalation, physical violence, peace-seeking, mediation or settlement) and how the strategies chosen interact with each other.2 There are a variety of possible conflict modes or strategies in handling these conflicts that exist at different levels. Mary Parker Follett3 identifies three main ways of dealing with conflicts whenever they arise: domination, compromise and integration. Under the domination technique, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png African Journal of International and Comparative Law Edinburgh University Press

Customary Arbitration in Nigeria: Development and Prospects

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
©© Edinburgh University Press 2011
Subject
General Issue Articles; African Studies
ISSN
0954-8890
eISSN
1755-1609
DOI
10.3366/ajicl.2011.0014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

OLUBAYO OLUDURO∗ I. INTRODUCTION Conflicts among human beings are as old as life itself and will always exist. Conflict can exist on many different levels, including international, intragroup, intergroup, interpersonal and intrapersonal. It can exist about different subject matters – ideals or beliefs, values, materials and resources, emotions, roles and responsibilities.1 Conflicts vary in terms of the social contexts in which they are located (two old friends, family members, neighbours, strangers, consumers and merchants, distant nation states); in the time span in which they are located (one-off or one-shot encounters and conflicts, long-standing or embedded conflicts, temporary or repeated conflicts in ongoing relationships like families and employment settings); and even within the same social environment or subject matter in the way in which the disputants treat the conflict, in the strategies, tactics and behaviours they employ (avoidance, self-help, peaceful negotiation, argument, escalation, physical violence, peace-seeking, mediation or settlement) and how the strategies chosen interact with each other.2 There are a variety of possible conflict modes or strategies in handling these conflicts that exist at different levels. Mary Parker Follett3 identifies three main ways of dealing with conflicts whenever they arise: domination, compromise and integration. Under the domination technique,

Journal

African Journal of International and Comparative LawEdinburgh University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2011

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