Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Craigievar: a fresh look at Scotland's premier tower-house

Craigievar: a fresh look at Scotland's premier tower-house By critically assessing the probable nature and extent of the Mortimer work at Craigievar an unrecognised aspect of this much-praised but inadequately analysed structure emerges. Comparison with certain other castles reveals a kinship with a limited but specific group. It also suggests that the concept of the Mortimer laird, when he commenced his work in the 1580s, was a deliberate statement of his Catholic faith. This was radically differentfrom that of the Protestant Forbes laird who acquired the unfinished building in 1610, and by 1626 had effectively removed or concealed the unwanted symbolism. Mortimer's personal stamp can be deduced and it can be asserted that hisfinished house would have been, externally at least, of deliberately less exaltedform. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

Craigievar: a fresh look at Scotland's premier tower-house

Architectural Heritage , Volume 11 (11): 1 – Jan 1, 2000

Loading next page...
 
/lp/edinburgh-university-press/craigievar-a-fresh-look-at-scotland-s-premier-tower-house-ipJVY2xSnH
Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2000.11.11.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

By critically assessing the probable nature and extent of the Mortimer work at Craigievar an unrecognised aspect of this much-praised but inadequately analysed structure emerges. Comparison with certain other castles reveals a kinship with a limited but specific group. It also suggests that the concept of the Mortimer laird, when he commenced his work in the 1580s, was a deliberate statement of his Catholic faith. This was radically differentfrom that of the Protestant Forbes laird who acquired the unfinished building in 1610, and by 1626 had effectively removed or concealed the unwanted symbolism. Mortimer's personal stamp can be deduced and it can be asserted that hisfinished house would have been, externally at least, of deliberately less exaltedform.

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2000

There are no references for this article.