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Community Housing and Regeneration: Government Policy and Housing Improvement

Community Housing and Regeneration: Government Policy and Housing Improvement David Whitham The Cullingworth Report, Scotland’s Older Houses, of 1967 provided a detailed and shocking reminder of the acute problem of inadequate housing in Scotland. In addition to policy changes, to increase rates of clearance and replacement, the report called for inquiry into various practical areas, including the scope for improvement of tenements and methods for determining housing quality, including environmental standards. This paper, along with following article in this journal, recounts the work of the multidisciplinary improvement team, formed in the Scottish Development Department as part of government’s response to Cullingworth’s recommendations, in investigating those problems, collaboration with housing agencies and local authorities, and some resulting publications. Housing conditions in Scotland were a matter of concern throughout the nineteenth century: census reports repeatedly emphasised the poor quality and overcrowded conditions in towns and in the country. From the mid-century, legislation enabled local authorities to require removal or improvement of dirty or defective dwellings on grounds of public health and acts of 1856 and 1857 provided criteria defining a house as ‘unfit for human habitation’, a phrase which was to remain on the statute book for more than a century. The housing act of 1890 consolidated the provisions http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

Community Housing and Regeneration: Government Policy and Housing Improvement

Architectural Heritage , Volume 21 (1): 59 – Nov 1, 2010

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© The Architectural Heritage Society of Scotland, 2011
Subject
Historical Studies
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2011.0006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

David Whitham The Cullingworth Report, Scotland’s Older Houses, of 1967 provided a detailed and shocking reminder of the acute problem of inadequate housing in Scotland. In addition to policy changes, to increase rates of clearance and replacement, the report called for inquiry into various practical areas, including the scope for improvement of tenements and methods for determining housing quality, including environmental standards. This paper, along with following article in this journal, recounts the work of the multidisciplinary improvement team, formed in the Scottish Development Department as part of government’s response to Cullingworth’s recommendations, in investigating those problems, collaboration with housing agencies and local authorities, and some resulting publications. Housing conditions in Scotland were a matter of concern throughout the nineteenth century: census reports repeatedly emphasised the poor quality and overcrowded conditions in towns and in the country. From the mid-century, legislation enabled local authorities to require removal or improvement of dirty or defective dwellings on grounds of public health and acts of 1856 and 1857 provided criteria defining a house as ‘unfit for human habitation’, a phrase which was to remain on the statute book for more than a century. The housing act of 1890 consolidated the provisions

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2010

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