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Collaborator: Ezra Pound, Translation, and Appropriation

Collaborator: Ezra Pound, Translation, and Appropriation This article discusses a number of Pound's poetic works, including Homage to Sextus Propertius, Hugh Selwyn Mauberley, and selected cantos, in relation to the practice of collaborative translation undertaken by numerous modernist authors. In Pound's case, such collaboration takes the form, in the main, of a creative partnership with poets central to his conception of the ‘Tradition’, for example, Homer and Propertius. In Pound's hands, the source text is ‘made new’ for a modernist target culture by means of strategies allied to his development of a poetics of appropriation, beginning with his composition of the Malatesta Cantos, in 1922–23. Pound's collaborative engagement with pre-existing texts, or ‘found materials’, is compared in detail to the notion of ‘translation as displacement’ developed in the recent conceptual writing of Kenneth Goldsmith, in particular, his multi-lingual Against Translation. This comparative reading, it is argued, assists in an appraisal of aspects of the politics of The Cantos, specifically the growing anti-capitalism of Pound's epic in the inter-war years. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modernist Cultures Edinburgh University Press

Collaborator: Ezra Pound, Translation, and Appropriation

Modernist Cultures , Volume 14 (1): 19 – Feb 1, 2019

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2041-1022
eISSN
1753-8629
DOI
10.3366/mod.2019.0238
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article discusses a number of Pound's poetic works, including Homage to Sextus Propertius, Hugh Selwyn Mauberley, and selected cantos, in relation to the practice of collaborative translation undertaken by numerous modernist authors. In Pound's case, such collaboration takes the form, in the main, of a creative partnership with poets central to his conception of the ‘Tradition’, for example, Homer and Propertius. In Pound's hands, the source text is ‘made new’ for a modernist target culture by means of strategies allied to his development of a poetics of appropriation, beginning with his composition of the Malatesta Cantos, in 1922–23. Pound's collaborative engagement with pre-existing texts, or ‘found materials’, is compared in detail to the notion of ‘translation as displacement’ developed in the recent conceptual writing of Kenneth Goldsmith, in particular, his multi-lingual Against Translation. This comparative reading, it is argued, assists in an appraisal of aspects of the politics of The Cantos, specifically the growing anti-capitalism of Pound's epic in the inter-war years.

Journal

Modernist CulturesEdinburgh University Press

Published: Feb 1, 2019

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