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Classical Modernism in Fifties Edinburgh: Adam House, by William Kininmonth, 1950–1954

Classical Modernism in Fifties Edinburgh: Adam House, by William Kininmonth, 1950–1954 Adam House, the University of Edinburgh's Examinations School in Chambers Street, Edinburgh, was built to the designs of William Kininmonth of the Rowand Anderson Partnership between 1950 and 1954. With a severe ‘Adams’ façade set against a Festival-style interior and rear elevation, the building provides a fine and unusual example of the spirit of pluralism – mixing contemporary and traditional influences at will – characteristic of much of the best of 1950s British Architecture. In this paper, having introduced the building with an account of its early history, I wish to discuss some of the Scottish influences – both classical and modernist – which informed Kininmonth's design. I shall conclude by arguing that Scottish architectural history owes more attention both to the building and its architect than either have hitherto received. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

Classical Modernism in Fifties Edinburgh: Adam House, by William Kininmonth, 1950–1954

Architectural Heritage , Volume 5 (1): 97 – Jan 1, 1994

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.1994.5.1.97
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Adam House, the University of Edinburgh's Examinations School in Chambers Street, Edinburgh, was built to the designs of William Kininmonth of the Rowand Anderson Partnership between 1950 and 1954. With a severe ‘Adams’ façade set against a Festival-style interior and rear elevation, the building provides a fine and unusual example of the spirit of pluralism – mixing contemporary and traditional influences at will – characteristic of much of the best of 1950s British Architecture. In this paper, having introduced the building with an account of its early history, I wish to discuss some of the Scottish influences – both classical and modernist – which informed Kininmonth's design. I shall conclude by arguing that Scottish architectural history owes more attention both to the building and its architect than either have hitherto received.

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1994

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