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Clare Davidson, College Voices: The Story of Christ's College, Aberdeen

Clare Davidson, College Voices: The Story of Christ's College, Aberdeen SCOTTISH CHURCH HISTORY 143 trades in Edinburgh from having a single focal point to display their corporate image (p. 136). Instead, members were scattered around the capital’s several parish churches. Corporatism was made no easier by the fact that none of Edinburgh’s trades were permitted to build their own pews or boxes in this period, in contrast to other burghs (p. 135). Above all, however, the Reformation forced the group to find a new home, as their altar in St Giles was removed and the aisle in which they met was repurposed. Perhaps ironically, the group purchased a pre-Reformation chapel in Niddry’s Wynd in 1601 and had to accommodate its operations into this formerly Catholic space (p. 137). The move resulted in the group adopting the name of the chapel – St Mary’s – into their title, reflecting what Allen calls the ‘complex’ process of accommodation and change experienced by institutions that existed through the Reformation. Building Early Modern Edinburgh is an important book. It takes a certain élan to approach sources of this nature when other scholars will actively ignore them due to their complexity. In so doing, Allen has paved a way for scholars in the future http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scottish Church History Edinburgh University Press

Clare Davidson, College Voices: The Story of Christ's College, Aberdeen

Scottish Church History , Volume 49 (2): 3 – Oct 1, 2020

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2516-6298
eISSN
2516-6301
DOI
10.3366/sch.2020.0034
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

SCOTTISH CHURCH HISTORY 143 trades in Edinburgh from having a single focal point to display their corporate image (p. 136). Instead, members were scattered around the capital’s several parish churches. Corporatism was made no easier by the fact that none of Edinburgh’s trades were permitted to build their own pews or boxes in this period, in contrast to other burghs (p. 135). Above all, however, the Reformation forced the group to find a new home, as their altar in St Giles was removed and the aisle in which they met was repurposed. Perhaps ironically, the group purchased a pre-Reformation chapel in Niddry’s Wynd in 1601 and had to accommodate its operations into this formerly Catholic space (p. 137). The move resulted in the group adopting the name of the chapel – St Mary’s – into their title, reflecting what Allen calls the ‘complex’ process of accommodation and change experienced by institutions that existed through the Reformation. Building Early Modern Edinburgh is an important book. It takes a certain élan to approach sources of this nature when other scholars will actively ignore them due to their complexity. In so doing, Allen has paved a way for scholars in the future

Journal

Scottish Church HistoryEdinburgh University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2020

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