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Church extension and division in 1830s Inverness: the East Church and the Rev. Archibald Cook

Church extension and division in 1830s Inverness: the East Church and the Rev. Archibald Cook Church extension and division in 1830s Inverness: the East Church and the Rev. Archibald Cook NORMAN CAMPBELL, M.A. Inverness, by 1800, was a centre for diffusing evangelical teaching in the northern Highlands. The split in the town's East church, occasioned by disagreement over the choice of minister in the mid-1830s, sheds light on the social and ecclesiastical influences being brought to bear on a bilingual urban centre. It may be useful to sketch briefly the ecclesiastical scene in Inverness and a little of the social context in the first half of the nineteenth century. The First Statistical Account listed the town as containing small congregations of anti-Burghers and Episcopalians, as well as a Methodist meeting-house, a Roman Catholic congregation and three charges in the Established Church of Scotland in the last decade of the eighteenth century.1 By the mid-1830s, when the two reporters in the town for the New Statistical Account seem to have done their work, there were still three Established charges as well as the chapel of ease. The building of another parish church was contemplated. There were also groups of Seceders, Episcopalians, Roman Catholics, Independents, Baptists and Methodists. The chapel of ease (East Church) is said http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scottish Church History Edinburgh University Press

Church extension and division in 1830s Inverness: the East Church and the Rev. Archibald Cook

Scottish Church History , Volume 32 (1): 21 – Oct 1, 2002

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2516-6298
eISSN
2516-6301
DOI
10.3366/sch.2002.32.1.15
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Church extension and division in 1830s Inverness: the East Church and the Rev. Archibald Cook NORMAN CAMPBELL, M.A. Inverness, by 1800, was a centre for diffusing evangelical teaching in the northern Highlands. The split in the town's East church, occasioned by disagreement over the choice of minister in the mid-1830s, sheds light on the social and ecclesiastical influences being brought to bear on a bilingual urban centre. It may be useful to sketch briefly the ecclesiastical scene in Inverness and a little of the social context in the first half of the nineteenth century. The First Statistical Account listed the town as containing small congregations of anti-Burghers and Episcopalians, as well as a Methodist meeting-house, a Roman Catholic congregation and three charges in the Established Church of Scotland in the last decade of the eighteenth century.1 By the mid-1830s, when the two reporters in the town for the New Statistical Account seem to have done their work, there were still three Established charges as well as the chapel of ease. The building of another parish church was contemplated. There were also groups of Seceders, Episcopalians, Roman Catholics, Independents, Baptists and Methodists. The chapel of ease (East Church) is said

Journal

Scottish Church HistoryEdinburgh University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2002

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