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Carrie Preston, Modernism's Mythic Pose: Gender, Genre, Solo Performance (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011). xiv+357pp. ISBN: 9780199766260.

Carrie Preston, Modernism's Mythic Pose: Gender, Genre, Solo Performance (New York: Oxford... Furthermore, the visions of literature and its task offered by Stevens and de Man are inextricably linked to the academy, to which and within which they intend their work to resonate. As Goldstone concludes (with a neatly tautological flourish), word always inheres in world: `the poem is what it is because we are what we are' (185). Fictions of Autonomy is well worth reading, especially for Goldstone's consistently perceptive and rewarding analyses of the texts he marshals in support of his argument. The overall conceit of the book, however, remains somewhat problematic. It is difficult to shake the feeling that to call autonomy `relative' or label it a `fiction', as Goldstone regularly does, is to deprive it of the very quality that makes it what it is. Goldstone wants, it seems, to `rescue' autonomy and restore it to the critical lexicon ­ but he does so only by granting from the outset that literary autonomy as he defines it is never entirely autonomous. However, once one grants the plausibility of partial or `relative autonomy' as a theoretical concept, Fictions of Autonomy offers the reader a compelling take on the self-awareness of modernist writers, and, most usefully, provides a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modernist Cultures Edinburgh University Press

Carrie Preston, Modernism's Mythic Pose: Gender, Genre, Solo Performance (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011). xiv+357pp. ISBN: 9780199766260.

Modernist Cultures , Volume 9 (2): 306 – Oct 1, 2014

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2014
Subject
Book Reviews; Film, Media and Cultural Studies
ISSN
2041-1022
eISSN
1753-8629
DOI
10.3366/mod.2014.0089
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Furthermore, the visions of literature and its task offered by Stevens and de Man are inextricably linked to the academy, to which and within which they intend their work to resonate. As Goldstone concludes (with a neatly tautological flourish), word always inheres in world: `the poem is what it is because we are what we are' (185). Fictions of Autonomy is well worth reading, especially for Goldstone's consistently perceptive and rewarding analyses of the texts he marshals in support of his argument. The overall conceit of the book, however, remains somewhat problematic. It is difficult to shake the feeling that to call autonomy `relative' or label it a `fiction', as Goldstone regularly does, is to deprive it of the very quality that makes it what it is. Goldstone wants, it seems, to `rescue' autonomy and restore it to the critical lexicon ­ but he does so only by granting from the outset that literary autonomy as he defines it is never entirely autonomous. However, once one grants the plausibility of partial or `relative autonomy' as a theoretical concept, Fictions of Autonomy offers the reader a compelling take on the self-awareness of modernist writers, and, most usefully, provides a

Journal

Modernist CulturesEdinburgh University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2014

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