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Bob Morris and the History of Class

Bob Morris and the History of Class International Review of Scottish Studies 48.1 (2023): 13–14 DOI: 10.3366/irss.2023.0005 © Edinburgh University Press www.euppublishing.com/irss Stana Nenadic Bob Morris was best known in his early career as a historian of nineteenth-century class and, especially, the middle classes. Even his first significant publication, Cholera 1832: The Social Response to an Epidemic (1976), pivoted the explanation for this tragedy of early industrializing cities as the failure of the property-owning middle class to understand and address the diseconomies of rapid urban growth without proper sanitation. Several key dimensions of his work on the middle class, all innovative and influential, can be identified. The role of the family and of women were central to his understanding of class. In this, Bob was part of a wider community of scholars working from the 1970s to the ‘90s on gender history and family history that included such luminaries as Catherine Hall and Leonore Davidoff of Family Fortunes fame, with whom he shared many common interests. The importance of wealth transmission within and between families, mostly taking the form of urban property and business assets, was a pivotal theme. Through his research, Bob demonstrated the existence of a property cycle within urban middle-class families and communities http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Review of Scottish Studies Edinburgh University Press

Bob Morris and the History of Class

International Review of Scottish Studies , Volume 48 (1): 2 – Jun 1, 2023

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
1923-5755
eISSN
1923-5763
DOI
10.3366/irss.2023.0005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

International Review of Scottish Studies 48.1 (2023): 13–14 DOI: 10.3366/irss.2023.0005 © Edinburgh University Press www.euppublishing.com/irss Stana Nenadic Bob Morris was best known in his early career as a historian of nineteenth-century class and, especially, the middle classes. Even his first significant publication, Cholera 1832: The Social Response to an Epidemic (1976), pivoted the explanation for this tragedy of early industrializing cities as the failure of the property-owning middle class to understand and address the diseconomies of rapid urban growth without proper sanitation. Several key dimensions of his work on the middle class, all innovative and influential, can be identified. The role of the family and of women were central to his understanding of class. In this, Bob was part of a wider community of scholars working from the 1970s to the ‘90s on gender history and family history that included such luminaries as Catherine Hall and Leonore Davidoff of Family Fortunes fame, with whom he shared many common interests. The importance of wealth transmission within and between families, mostly taking the form of urban property and business assets, was a pivotal theme. Through his research, Bob demonstrated the existence of a property cycle within urban middle-class families and communities

Journal

International Review of Scottish StudiesEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2023

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