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ASSIST in Govan – A Case of Accidental Conservation

ASSIST in Govan – A Case of Accidental Conservation Raymond Young ASSIST is an architectural practice with offices in Glasgow and Edinburgh. It is one of the very few architectural cooperatives that have survived from the 1970s when it was created as a Research Unit of the Department of Architecture of University of Strathclyde, from which it left in 1983. Its origins are in the early days of the tenement improvement programme in Glasgow – indeed, it could be argued that without ASSIST the physical shape of Glasgow would be quite different today. This paper is a personal account, maybe somewhat biased, as under the supervision of then Senior Lecturer Jim Johnson (later to become a well loved and influential Director of the Old Town Renewal Trust in Edinburgh), the author developed an experimental action research project in 1970 investigating the possibility of voluntary improvement. The project was interested in public participation in planning and architecture, not in saving tenements. In the late 1960s architecture students in Glasgow were interested in the latest buildings – like Cumbernauld Town Centre and Basil Spence’s flats in the Gorbals – rather than our Victorian heritage. They were studying in a city that was in the midst of enormous physical and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

ASSIST in Govan – A Case of Accidental Conservation

Architectural Heritage , Volume 21 (1): 93 – Nov 1, 2010

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© The Architectural Heritage Society of Scotland, 2011
Subject
Historical Studies
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2011.0008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Raymond Young ASSIST is an architectural practice with offices in Glasgow and Edinburgh. It is one of the very few architectural cooperatives that have survived from the 1970s when it was created as a Research Unit of the Department of Architecture of University of Strathclyde, from which it left in 1983. Its origins are in the early days of the tenement improvement programme in Glasgow – indeed, it could be argued that without ASSIST the physical shape of Glasgow would be quite different today. This paper is a personal account, maybe somewhat biased, as under the supervision of then Senior Lecturer Jim Johnson (later to become a well loved and influential Director of the Old Town Renewal Trust in Edinburgh), the author developed an experimental action research project in 1970 investigating the possibility of voluntary improvement. The project was interested in public participation in planning and architecture, not in saving tenements. In the late 1960s architecture students in Glasgow were interested in the latest buildings – like Cumbernauld Town Centre and Basil Spence’s flats in the Gorbals – rather than our Victorian heritage. They were studying in a city that was in the midst of enormous physical and

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2010

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