Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Architecture, Improvement and the ‘New Science’ in Early Modern Scotland

Architecture, Improvement and the ‘New Science’ in Early Modern Scotland Matthew Walker In Sir William Bruce's lifetime, the relationship between architecture and natural, experimental and mechanical philosophies ­ the so-called `new sciences' ­ was a fundamental one.1 It was reflected in the presence of major architects in important European scientific institutions in the period: groups such as the Royal Society of London and the Académie des sciences in Paris.2 These organisations could count among their members Sir Christopher Wren, Robert Hooke, François Blondel and Claude Perrault, all of whom practised architecture alongside other intellectual pursuits that we would now identify as science. In Scotland, the situation was somewhat different due to the fact that the new science was never institutionalised here, as it was in England and France. Nonetheless, as this article will demonstrate, many of Scotland's more prominent late seventeenth-century intellectuals counted architecture among their interests. Additionally, proposals were made in Scotland for scientific groups that, had they got off the ground, would have almost certainly promoted architecture as an intellectual subject in their meetings. What follows is an attempt to reconstruct how Scottish intellectuals in this period conceived of architecture as an intellectual discipline and as a practice. Ultimately, this paper will conclude that their approach http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

Architecture, Improvement and the ‘New Science’ in Early Modern Scotland

Architectural Heritage , Volume 23 (1): 41 – Nov 1, 2012

Loading next page...
 
/lp/edinburgh-university-press/architecture-improvement-and-the-new-science-in-early-modern-scotland-weGC6J4wem
Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© The Architectural Heritage Society of Scotland, 2012
Subject
Background; Historical Studies
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2012.0032
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Matthew Walker In Sir William Bruce's lifetime, the relationship between architecture and natural, experimental and mechanical philosophies ­ the so-called `new sciences' ­ was a fundamental one.1 It was reflected in the presence of major architects in important European scientific institutions in the period: groups such as the Royal Society of London and the Académie des sciences in Paris.2 These organisations could count among their members Sir Christopher Wren, Robert Hooke, François Blondel and Claude Perrault, all of whom practised architecture alongside other intellectual pursuits that we would now identify as science. In Scotland, the situation was somewhat different due to the fact that the new science was never institutionalised here, as it was in England and France. Nonetheless, as this article will demonstrate, many of Scotland's more prominent late seventeenth-century intellectuals counted architecture among their interests. Additionally, proposals were made in Scotland for scientific groups that, had they got off the ground, would have almost certainly promoted architecture as an intellectual subject in their meetings. What follows is an attempt to reconstruct how Scottish intellectuals in this period conceived of architecture as an intellectual discipline and as a practice. Ultimately, this paper will conclude that their approach

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2012

There are no references for this article.