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Andrew Gaedtke, Modernism and the Machinery of Madness: Psychosis, Technology, and Narrative Worlds

Andrew Gaedtke, Modernism and the Machinery of Madness: Psychosis, Technology, and Narrative Worlds Modernist Cultures research allows Armond to get away with provocative comments such as ‘Barnes can be argued to be more “baroque’’ than the Trauerspiel dramatists themselves’ (80). There are, inevitably in a single book, areas which I would be keen to explore further: firstly, there is the sense throughout that this book disturbs the periodicity of modernism and some additional reflection on this, especially in light of modernist studies’ preoccupation with temporality, would be fascinating. Equally interesting would be a deeper reading of the physical body on the stage and the way it retells the baroque in playful, complex ways. Perhaps expressionism’s substantive documentation of the ‘expressionist actor’ (such as it is) from Paul Kornfeld onwards would enable the extension of a theme that ripples under the surface of this book throughout. These are less criticisms than they are examples of just two ways this book enabled me to make new connections. Importantly this is not a book that simply takes theatrical embodied practices and reads them flat on the pages of modernist prose and poetry. There is the feeling throughout that Armond is resolutely interested in the stage. This comes out most notably (and most innovatively) in her http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modernist Cultures Edinburgh University Press

Andrew Gaedtke, Modernism and the Machinery of Madness: Psychosis, Technology, and Narrative Worlds

Modernist Cultures , Volume 15 (4): 3 – Nov 1, 2020

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2041-1022
eISSN
1753-8629
DOI
10.3366/mod.2020.0313
Publisher site
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Abstract

Modernist Cultures research allows Armond to get away with provocative comments such as ‘Barnes can be argued to be more “baroque’’ than the Trauerspiel dramatists themselves’ (80). There are, inevitably in a single book, areas which I would be keen to explore further: firstly, there is the sense throughout that this book disturbs the periodicity of modernism and some additional reflection on this, especially in light of modernist studies’ preoccupation with temporality, would be fascinating. Equally interesting would be a deeper reading of the physical body on the stage and the way it retells the baroque in playful, complex ways. Perhaps expressionism’s substantive documentation of the ‘expressionist actor’ (such as it is) from Paul Kornfeld onwards would enable the extension of a theme that ripples under the surface of this book throughout. These are less criticisms than they are examples of just two ways this book enabled me to make new connections. Importantly this is not a book that simply takes theatrical embodied practices and reads them flat on the pages of modernist prose and poetry. There is the feeling throughout that Armond is resolutely interested in the stage. This comes out most notably (and most innovatively) in her

Journal

Modernist CulturesEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2020

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