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Andrew Frayn, Writing Disenchantment: British First World War Prose, 1914–30

Andrew Frayn, Writing Disenchantment: British First World War Prose, 1914–30 Modernist Cultures filmmakers, Paraskeva also discusses the works of film theorists including Rudolf Arnheim, Bela Balász, Stanley Cavell, Michel Chion, Gilles Deleuze, Sergei Eisenstein, Jean Epstein, Laura Mulvey, and Vsevolod Pudovkin. Andrew Frayn, Writing Disenchantment: British First World War Prose, 1914–30 (Manchester: Manchester University Press. 2014). x + 259 pp. (£80 hbk). ISBN: 9780719089220. In 1922 C. E. Montague described how the optimism and commitment of those who had fought in the trenches had given way to a sense of profound disenchantment. Their struggles seemed to embody those of a nation unable to reconcile its initial attitudes to the prospect of war with the catastrophic and traumatising realities that followed. Taking Montague’s study as the articulation of a widespread cultural phenomenon, Andrew Frayn has written a stimulating assessment of disenchantment as a distinctive mode of writing. In its insistence that disenchantment was not only a response to the war but was more broadly a condition of modernity and thus had pre-war origins, his analysis invites comparison with Peter Leese’s seminal study of shell shock (2002), which traced its roots to the rapid nineteenth- century growth of industrial society and urbanisation. Like Leese, Frayn scrutinises accepted narratives about responses to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modernist Cultures Edinburgh University Press

Andrew Frayn, Writing Disenchantment: British First World War Prose, 1914–30

Modernist Cultures , Volume 13 (4): 3 – Nov 1, 2018

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2041-1022
eISSN
1753-8629
DOI
10.3366/mod.2018.0233
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Modernist Cultures filmmakers, Paraskeva also discusses the works of film theorists including Rudolf Arnheim, Bela Balász, Stanley Cavell, Michel Chion, Gilles Deleuze, Sergei Eisenstein, Jean Epstein, Laura Mulvey, and Vsevolod Pudovkin. Andrew Frayn, Writing Disenchantment: British First World War Prose, 1914–30 (Manchester: Manchester University Press. 2014). x + 259 pp. (£80 hbk). ISBN: 9780719089220. In 1922 C. E. Montague described how the optimism and commitment of those who had fought in the trenches had given way to a sense of profound disenchantment. Their struggles seemed to embody those of a nation unable to reconcile its initial attitudes to the prospect of war with the catastrophic and traumatising realities that followed. Taking Montague’s study as the articulation of a widespread cultural phenomenon, Andrew Frayn has written a stimulating assessment of disenchantment as a distinctive mode of writing. In its insistence that disenchantment was not only a response to the war but was more broadly a condition of modernity and thus had pre-war origins, his analysis invites comparison with Peter Leese’s seminal study of shell shock (2002), which traced its roots to the rapid nineteenth- century growth of industrial society and urbanisation. Like Leese, Frayn scrutinises accepted narratives about responses to

Journal

Modernist CulturesEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2018

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