Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A REDD Solution to a Green Problem: Using REDD plus to Address Deforestation in Ghana through Benefit Sharing and Community Self-empowerment

A REDD Solution to a Green Problem: Using REDD plus to Address Deforestation in Ghana through... WILLIAM DANIEL NARTEY I. INTRODUCTION When you enter a grove peopled with ancient trees, higher than the ordinary and shutting out the sky with their thickly intertwined branches, do not the stately shadows of the wood, the stillness of the place, and the awful gloom of this doomed cavern then strike you with the presence of a deity? (Seneca, 4 BC­AD 65) As the ancient Roman philosopher correctly observed, a reverent presence is felt when one enters the forest. Its composition of still beauty and the feel of protection it generates confirm that it is indeed God's gift to humanity. Then should humans not be thankful for this gift bestowed upon them, accord it with respect, and treat it with the utmost care? Unfortunately, man's desire for economic wealth and a need for survival have led to a reckless and negligible attitude toward the use and care of the world's forests. The process of converting forests into non-forests deforestation claims 17 million hectares of the world's tropical forests each year. 1 Deforestation has a significant impact on environmental damage and economic deterioration, and a direct effect on climate change.2 In addition to releasing stored carbon, which is a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png African Journal of International and Comparative Law Edinburgh University Press

A REDD Solution to a Green Problem: Using REDD plus to Address Deforestation in Ghana through Benefit Sharing and Community Self-empowerment

Loading next page...
 
/lp/edinburgh-university-press/a-redd-solution-to-a-green-problem-using-redd-plus-to-address-QMR0ml0Kfz
Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2014
Subject
Articles; African Studies
ISSN
0954-8890
eISSN
1755-1609
DOI
10.3366/ajicl.2014.0081
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

WILLIAM DANIEL NARTEY I. INTRODUCTION When you enter a grove peopled with ancient trees, higher than the ordinary and shutting out the sky with their thickly intertwined branches, do not the stately shadows of the wood, the stillness of the place, and the awful gloom of this doomed cavern then strike you with the presence of a deity? (Seneca, 4 BC­AD 65) As the ancient Roman philosopher correctly observed, a reverent presence is felt when one enters the forest. Its composition of still beauty and the feel of protection it generates confirm that it is indeed God's gift to humanity. Then should humans not be thankful for this gift bestowed upon them, accord it with respect, and treat it with the utmost care? Unfortunately, man's desire for economic wealth and a need for survival have led to a reckless and negligible attitude toward the use and care of the world's forests. The process of converting forests into non-forests deforestation claims 17 million hectares of the world's tropical forests each year. 1 Deforestation has a significant impact on environmental damage and economic deterioration, and a direct effect on climate change.2 In addition to releasing stored carbon, which is a

Journal

African Journal of International and Comparative LawEdinburgh University Press

Published: Feb 1, 2014

There are no references for this article.