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A Prospect on Antiquity and Britannia on Edge: Landscape Design and the Work of Sir William Bruce and Alexander Edward

A Prospect on Antiquity and Britannia on Edge: Landscape Design and the Work of Sir William Bruce... John Lowrey This paper considers the main characteristics of the Scottish formal landscape, as established by Sir William Bruce. It considers Bruce's key contribution but also how his collaboration with Alexander Edward allowed the further development of the characteristics of the Scottish designed landscape, partly under the influence of France and also in relation to the notion of the Scottish Historical Landscape. It focuses on two case studies, Kinnaird Castle in Angus and Hopetoun House, proposing a new interpretation of the latter in particular. Most recent scholarship on Scottish formal landscape design has identified, on the one hand, its strong relationship with wider European trends: philosophically, culturally, economically and formalistically, while, on the other, has stressed its individuality, in particular, its strong roots in local concerns. These have taken mainly two forms. First, there has been some emphasis on the Scottish designed landscape as a landscape of productivity, in which the economic returns of the estate were at least as important as the formal layout and intricate parterres typical of the European baroque garden. What might be called the landscape of improvement, in the late seventeenth century, is connected with improving landowners who prefigure the enlightened landlords who http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

A Prospect on Antiquity and Britannia on Edge: Landscape Design and the Work of Sir William Bruce and Alexander Edward

Architectural Heritage , Volume 23 (1): 57 – Nov 1, 2012

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© The Architectural Heritage Society of Scotland, 2012
Subject
Bruce and his architectural contemporaries; Historical Studies
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2012.0033
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

John Lowrey This paper considers the main characteristics of the Scottish formal landscape, as established by Sir William Bruce. It considers Bruce's key contribution but also how his collaboration with Alexander Edward allowed the further development of the characteristics of the Scottish designed landscape, partly under the influence of France and also in relation to the notion of the Scottish Historical Landscape. It focuses on two case studies, Kinnaird Castle in Angus and Hopetoun House, proposing a new interpretation of the latter in particular. Most recent scholarship on Scottish formal landscape design has identified, on the one hand, its strong relationship with wider European trends: philosophically, culturally, economically and formalistically, while, on the other, has stressed its individuality, in particular, its strong roots in local concerns. These have taken mainly two forms. First, there has been some emphasis on the Scottish designed landscape as a landscape of productivity, in which the economic returns of the estate were at least as important as the formal layout and intricate parterres typical of the European baroque garden. What might be called the landscape of improvement, in the late seventeenth century, is connected with improving landowners who prefigure the enlightened landlords who

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2012

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