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A lost aesthetic: traditional architectural form in wood and its neglect

A lost aesthetic: traditional architectural form in wood and its neglect Towards the end of the nineteenth century, the last timber building in Glasgow's High Street was demolished. Once there had been hundreds if not thousands of such structures throughout Scotland. Even 50 years before, they were still common in the older parts of towns, their form as familiar to generations of Scots as the stone tenement is to us now. Today, in the whole of Scotland, less than a handful of much altered survivors are left, the final relics of an architectural tradition that is now almost completely lost to us. How has such a major part of the architectural heritage been virtually wiped from the consciousness of historians and public alike? The following paper charts its downfall and suggests the time has come for timber buildings to take their proper place not only in the evolution of the Scottish built environment, but also as an architectural form with as much to offer, and as much right to consideration in new designs, as any other. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

A lost aesthetic: traditional architectural form in wood and its neglect

Architectural Heritage , Volume 15 (1): 1 – Nov 1, 2004

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2004.15.1.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Towards the end of the nineteenth century, the last timber building in Glasgow's High Street was demolished. Once there had been hundreds if not thousands of such structures throughout Scotland. Even 50 years before, they were still common in the older parts of towns, their form as familiar to generations of Scots as the stone tenement is to us now. Today, in the whole of Scotland, less than a handful of much altered survivors are left, the final relics of an architectural tradition that is now almost completely lost to us. How has such a major part of the architectural heritage been virtually wiped from the consciousness of historians and public alike? The following paper charts its downfall and suggests the time has come for timber buildings to take their proper place not only in the evolution of the Scottish built environment, but also as an architectural form with as much to offer, and as much right to consideration in new designs, as any other.

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2004

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