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A Cult of Mary Queen of Scots?

A Cult of Mary Queen of Scots? ‘Architecture has its Political Use; publick Buildings being the Ornament of a Country; it establishes a Nation, draws People and Commerce; makes the People love their native Country, which Passion is the Original of all great Actions in a Common-wealth.’ Sir Christopher Wren, Parentalia The traditional preoccupation of dating Scottish country houses as being pre- or post-reformation, and then - uniquely in Europe - by plan form (L-shaped etc.), has obscured the three phases of significant architectural change, reversal and then re-emergence in Scottish architecture during the course of the sixteenth century. This paper suggests that the inspiration for the nineteenth century Baronialists can be identified as a period c. 1600, when, after two or three decades' rejection, the French-inspired architecture of the ‘Marian’ court re-emerged in the reign of her son. It remained influential right to the end of the seventeenth century. Did it represent a rehabilitation - a cult - of Mary Queen of Scots? http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

A Cult of Mary Queen of Scots?

Architectural Heritage , Volume 18 (1): 55 – Nov 1, 2007

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2007.18.1.55
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

‘Architecture has its Political Use; publick Buildings being the Ornament of a Country; it establishes a Nation, draws People and Commerce; makes the People love their native Country, which Passion is the Original of all great Actions in a Common-wealth.’ Sir Christopher Wren, Parentalia The traditional preoccupation of dating Scottish country houses as being pre- or post-reformation, and then - uniquely in Europe - by plan form (L-shaped etc.), has obscured the three phases of significant architectural change, reversal and then re-emergence in Scottish architecture during the course of the sixteenth century. This paper suggests that the inspiration for the nineteenth century Baronialists can be identified as a period c. 1600, when, after two or three decades' rejection, the French-inspired architecture of the ‘Marian’ court re-emerged in the reign of her son. It remained influential right to the end of the seventeenth century. Did it represent a rehabilitation - a cult - of Mary Queen of Scots?

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2007

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