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A Critique of the Decision of the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights Permitting the Demolition of the SADC Tribunal: Politics versus Economics and Human Rights

A Critique of the Decision of the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights Permitting the... JEREMY SARKIN I. INTRODUCTION The beginning of the twenty-first century showed signs of hope for the human rights situation in Africa.1 Over a twenty-year period, the human rights situation on the African continent seemingly improved, albeit slowly and unevenly.2 Some ten years ago the number of violent conflicts, and therefore the extent of gross human rights violation committed, dropped significantly.3 Today, however, some of the problematic issues concerning human rights in Africa are again centre stage. This is because recent events seem to be denting the position that Africa's human rights situation was improving.4 According to the 2015 Fragile States Index, the top 6 most fragile states in the world are in Africa. Even more concerning is that 20 out of the 26 most fragile states are in Africa.5 There are allegations of crimes against humanity in Eritrea, genocide in Sudan, various types of human BA LLB (Natal) LLM (Harvard) LLD (UWC). Professor of Law, University of South Africa (UNISA), Attorney in South Africa and Attorney in New York, USA. He is a former ChairRapporteur, United Nations Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances. 1 See further P. Zeleza and P. McConnaughay, `The Struggle for Human Rights in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png African Journal of International and Comparative Law Edinburgh University Press

A Critique of the Decision of the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights Permitting the Demolition of the SADC Tribunal: Politics versus Economics and Human Rights

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2016
Subject
Articles; African Studies
ISSN
0954-8890
eISSN
1755-1609
DOI
10.3366/ajicl.2016.0151
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

JEREMY SARKIN I. INTRODUCTION The beginning of the twenty-first century showed signs of hope for the human rights situation in Africa.1 Over a twenty-year period, the human rights situation on the African continent seemingly improved, albeit slowly and unevenly.2 Some ten years ago the number of violent conflicts, and therefore the extent of gross human rights violation committed, dropped significantly.3 Today, however, some of the problematic issues concerning human rights in Africa are again centre stage. This is because recent events seem to be denting the position that Africa's human rights situation was improving.4 According to the 2015 Fragile States Index, the top 6 most fragile states in the world are in Africa. Even more concerning is that 20 out of the 26 most fragile states are in Africa.5 There are allegations of crimes against humanity in Eritrea, genocide in Sudan, various types of human BA LLB (Natal) LLM (Harvard) LLD (UWC). Professor of Law, University of South Africa (UNISA), Attorney in South Africa and Attorney in New York, USA. He is a former ChairRapporteur, United Nations Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances. 1 See further P. Zeleza and P. McConnaughay, `The Struggle for Human Rights in

Journal

African Journal of International and Comparative LawEdinburgh University Press

Published: May 1, 2016

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