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A CONSTANT FLOW OF PEOPLE? MIGRATION IN NORTHERN NORWAY 1865–1900

A CONSTANT FLOW OF PEOPLE? MIGRATION IN NORTHERN NORWAY 1865–1900 In his classic study of in southern Sweden between 1840-1944, where he launched the theory of chain , the geographer Thorsten Hagerstrand stressed the more or less permanent nature of flows: 'The stability of this investigated field of indicates that [it] is very likely to represent the summarized social relations and geographical experiences of the population studied.'1 Two studies of in eastern Norway also give the impression that such flows remain constant in their direction and size over time. There was a stable geographic mobility from the interior towards the coast during the eighteenth century,2 and there is little about the development of in the study of circular and out from the municipality of Ullensaker to the north of Oslo.3 When I started work on my thesis about internal nineteenth-century in Norway in the late 1980s, one of the main aims was to challenge this notion of constant flows during a time when so many aspects of society changed in connection with industrialisation, urbanisation and e. To come to grips with a research question that involved both lots of individuals and the whole nation, it was necessary to study the development of an entire province (fylke) with statistics http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing Edinburgh University Press

A CONSTANT FLOW OF PEOPLE? MIGRATION IN NORTHERN NORWAY 1865–1900

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
1753-8548
eISSN
1755-1706
DOI
10.3366/hac.1999.11.1-2.45
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In his classic study of in southern Sweden between 1840-1944, where he launched the theory of chain , the geographer Thorsten Hagerstrand stressed the more or less permanent nature of flows: 'The stability of this investigated field of indicates that [it] is very likely to represent the summarized social relations and geographical experiences of the population studied.'1 Two studies of in eastern Norway also give the impression that such flows remain constant in their direction and size over time. There was a stable geographic mobility from the interior towards the coast during the eighteenth century,2 and there is little about the development of in the study of circular and out from the municipality of Ullensaker to the north of Oslo.3 When I started work on my thesis about internal nineteenth-century in Norway in the late 1980s, one of the main aims was to challenge this notion of constant flows during a time when so many aspects of society changed in connection with industrialisation, urbanisation and e. To come to grips with a research question that involved both lots of individuals and the whole nation, it was necessary to study the development of an entire province (fylke) with statistics

Journal

International Journal of Humanities and Arts ComputingEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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