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Writing the Nation: Textbooks of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan

Writing the Nation: Textbooks of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan Education is truly a mirror unto a people’s social being and it is also the means by which that being is reproduced and passed onto the next generation. For that reason education has been the main ideological battlefield between the economic, political, and cultural forces of oppression and the forces of national liberation and unity. The education system was the first fortress to be stormed by the spiritual army of colonialism, clearing and guarding the way for a permanent siege by the entire occupation forces of British imperialism. (Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Writers in Politics, 1997)2 These two quotes illustrate something of the transformative process the writing of history has undergone in the last two centuries. In the past, history has always served to explain peoples’ connection to the land on which they lived, to define many of their public and private relationships, and to interpret the spiritual and material phenomena surrounding their lives. Today, the writing of history fulfills much the same function. However, since the nineteenth century, history and historians have been recruited, both wittingly and unwittingly, into national projects all over the world, to delineate and simultaneously legitimate, the existence of new nation-states. The parameters of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East Duke University Press

Writing the Nation: Textbooks of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan

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References (10)

Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2001 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1089-201X
eISSN
1548-226X
DOI
10.1215/1089201X-21-1-2-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Education is truly a mirror unto a people’s social being and it is also the means by which that being is reproduced and passed onto the next generation. For that reason education has been the main ideological battlefield between the economic, political, and cultural forces of oppression and the forces of national liberation and unity. The education system was the first fortress to be stormed by the spiritual army of colonialism, clearing and guarding the way for a permanent siege by the entire occupation forces of British imperialism. (Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Writers in Politics, 1997)2 These two quotes illustrate something of the transformative process the writing of history has undergone in the last two centuries. In the past, history has always served to explain peoples’ connection to the land on which they lived, to define many of their public and private relationships, and to interpret the spiritual and material phenomena surrounding their lives. Today, the writing of history fulfills much the same function. However, since the nineteenth century, history and historians have been recruited, both wittingly and unwittingly, into national projects all over the world, to delineate and simultaneously legitimate, the existence of new nation-states. The parameters of

Journal

Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle EastDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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