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"Who Am I?"--Questions of Voluntarism in the Paradigm of "Socialist Alienation"

"Who Am I?"--Questions of Voluntarism in the Paradigm of "Socialist Alienation" Jing Wang Any significant chronicle of post-Mao intellectual history would have to start with the emergence of the problematic of humanism in the early 1980s. No matter how contemptuously Chinese avant-garde writers and critics now regard those earliest specimens of expose literature that promoted the “value and dignity of human beings” in crude confessional realism, it is precisely the literature’s complicitous relationship with the postrevolutionary politics of humanism that accounted for its quick popularity both at home, albeit for a short while, and abroad for a decade and beyond. Historical amnesia may be a malady that plagues the Chinese populace in the age of boom economics, but back in the late 1970s and early 1980s, remembrance was an exercise in which intellectuals and writers were engaged with unrelieved piety. For just under half a decade, confessions and self-introspection not only pervaded literary discourse, they emerged as a dominant trope in political discourse as well. positions 1995 by Duke University Press Wang Voluntarism a n d “Socialist Alienation” Certain unorthodox acknowledgments that Chinese Marxism was conscious of its own self-alienation characterizes the soul-searching mood no less poignantly and theatrically than the creative writers’ sentimental homage to the problem expressed http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

"Who Am I?"--Questions of Voluntarism in the Paradigm of "Socialist Alienation"

positions asia critique , Volume 3 (2) – Sep 1, 1995

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1995 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-3-2-450
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Jing Wang Any significant chronicle of post-Mao intellectual history would have to start with the emergence of the problematic of humanism in the early 1980s. No matter how contemptuously Chinese avant-garde writers and critics now regard those earliest specimens of expose literature that promoted the “value and dignity of human beings” in crude confessional realism, it is precisely the literature’s complicitous relationship with the postrevolutionary politics of humanism that accounted for its quick popularity both at home, albeit for a short while, and abroad for a decade and beyond. Historical amnesia may be a malady that plagues the Chinese populace in the age of boom economics, but back in the late 1970s and early 1980s, remembrance was an exercise in which intellectuals and writers were engaged with unrelieved piety. For just under half a decade, confessions and self-introspection not only pervaded literary discourse, they emerged as a dominant trope in political discourse as well. positions 1995 by Duke University Press Wang Voluntarism a n d “Socialist Alienation” Certain unorthodox acknowledgments that Chinese Marxism was conscious of its own self-alienation characterizes the soul-searching mood no less poignantly and theatrically than the creative writers’ sentimental homage to the problem expressed

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1995

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