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Where Is Ronny . . . (Ronnie rǔl ch’ajasŏ)

Where Is Ronny . . . (Ronnie rǔl ch’ajasŏ) Film Review Where Is Ronny ... (Ronnie rul ch 'ajas6) directed by Sim Sang­ guk. South Korea. 92 minutes. 2008. In recent years, tamunhwa (multi- or plural culture) has become a buzzword in South Korean society, thanks partly to government campaigns to raise aware­ ness regarding multicultural families (tamunhwa kaj6ng). In fact, it is customary today fo r corporations and private schools to offer preferential treatment to mul­ ticu ltural families, in terms of the slots available fo r schoolchildren and employ­ ment. According to official statistics, as of January 2012, 1. 5 million fo reigners (2. 8 percent of the total population) reside in South Korea. Excluded from this statistical assessment are illegal immigrants, whose population is estimated to be as much as 280,000. In contrast to their policies toward upwardly mobile mixed families, however, public and private sectors alike have done little to protect the basic rights of economically deprived, undocumented migrant workers and their non-Korean children. Between 200 8 and 2010, 33,000 illegal immigrants were deported from South Korea, and those who are fo rtunate enough to linger as lim­ inal subjects of the state (with no official status) are routinely denied their basic human rights http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Korean Studies Duke University Press

Where Is Ronny . . . (Ronnie rǔl ch’ajasŏ)

Journal of Korean Studies , Volume 18 (1) – Mar 13, 2013

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Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by the Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York
ISSN
0731-1613
eISSN
2158-1665
DOI
10.1353/jks.2013.0010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Film Review Where Is Ronny ... (Ronnie rul ch 'ajas6) directed by Sim Sang­ guk. South Korea. 92 minutes. 2008. In recent years, tamunhwa (multi- or plural culture) has become a buzzword in South Korean society, thanks partly to government campaigns to raise aware­ ness regarding multicultural families (tamunhwa kaj6ng). In fact, it is customary today fo r corporations and private schools to offer preferential treatment to mul­ ticu ltural families, in terms of the slots available fo r schoolchildren and employ­ ment. According to official statistics, as of January 2012, 1. 5 million fo reigners (2. 8 percent of the total population) reside in South Korea. Excluded from this statistical assessment are illegal immigrants, whose population is estimated to be as much as 280,000. In contrast to their policies toward upwardly mobile mixed families, however, public and private sectors alike have done little to protect the basic rights of economically deprived, undocumented migrant workers and their non-Korean children. Between 200 8 and 2010, 33,000 illegal immigrants were deported from South Korea, and those who are fo rtunate enough to linger as lim­ inal subjects of the state (with no official status) are routinely denied their basic human rights

Journal

Journal of Korean StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Mar 13, 2013

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