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"When Klopstock England Defied": Coleridge, Southey, and the German/English Hexameter

"When Klopstock England Defied": Coleridge, Southey, and the German/English Hexameter ATE IN SEPTEMBER OF 1799, Samuel Taylor Coleridge sent his clergyman brother George a somewhat condensed metrical paraphrase in dactylic hexameters, complete with prosodic markings, of “one of [his] favorite psalms, ” Psalm 46, telling his brother that, “allowing trochees for spondees as the nature of our language demands, he would find it “pretty accurate a Scansion”:2 ” God is our Strength and our Refuge: therefore will we not tremble, Tho’ the Earth be removed and tho’ the perpetual Mountains Sink in the Swell of the Ocean! God is our Strength and our Refuge! There is a River the Flowing whereof shall gladden the City, Hallelujah! the city of God! Jehovah shall help her. The Idolaters raged, the kingdoms were moving in fury; But he uttered his Voice: Earth melted away from beneath them. Halleluja! th’ Eternal is with us, Almighty Jehova! Fearful the works of the Lord, yea, fearful his Desolation; But He maketh the Battle to cease, he burneth the Spear and the Chariot. Halleluja! th’ Eternal is with us, the God of our Fathers. (CL 1:532-33; cf. CPW 1:601) The paraphrase, sent after “talking of Hexameters” at George’s house, was the latest of several attempts http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Duke University Press

"When Klopstock England Defied": Coleridge, Southey, and the German/English Hexameter

Comparative Literature , Volume 55 (2) – Jan 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by University of Oregon
ISSN
0010-4124
eISSN
1945-8517
DOI
10.1215/-55-2-130
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Abstract

ATE IN SEPTEMBER OF 1799, Samuel Taylor Coleridge sent his clergyman brother George a somewhat condensed metrical paraphrase in dactylic hexameters, complete with prosodic markings, of “one of [his] favorite psalms, ” Psalm 46, telling his brother that, “allowing trochees for spondees as the nature of our language demands, he would find it “pretty accurate a Scansion”:2 ” God is our Strength and our Refuge: therefore will we not tremble, Tho’ the Earth be removed and tho’ the perpetual Mountains Sink in the Swell of the Ocean! God is our Strength and our Refuge! There is a River the Flowing whereof shall gladden the City, Hallelujah! the city of God! Jehovah shall help her. The Idolaters raged, the kingdoms were moving in fury; But he uttered his Voice: Earth melted away from beneath them. Halleluja! th’ Eternal is with us, Almighty Jehova! Fearful the works of the Lord, yea, fearful his Desolation; But He maketh the Battle to cease, he burneth the Spear and the Chariot. Halleluja! th’ Eternal is with us, the God of our Fathers. (CL 1:532-33; cf. CPW 1:601) The paraphrase, sent after “talking of Hexameters” at George’s house, was the latest of several attempts

Journal

Comparative LiteratureDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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