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Vocal Register in Behn's Love-Letters between a Nobleman and His Sister

Vocal Register in Behn's Love-Letters between a Nobleman and His Sister English Language Notes 29 Poverty and Deviance in Early Modem Europe (Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1994) 9. “See Weimann 240. Also see Rackin 216. 31 See Michael D. Bristol, Carnival and Theater: Plebeian Culture and the Struc­ ture of Authority in Renaissance England (New York: Methuen, 1985) 88-103. William C. Carroll, Fat King, Lean Beggar: Representations of Poverty in the Age of Shakespeare (Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1996) 156; and also by Carroll, “Language, Politics, and Poverty in Shakespearian Drama,” Shakespeare Survey 44 (1992): 19-21. Also see Rackin 207-08. For an excellent discussion of critical responses to Shakespeare’s Cade, see Caldwell, 67-70. It is interesting to note that both Tillyardians and New Historicists evaluate Shakespeare’s position in 2 Henry VI as anti-populist. 32 “Murdering Peasants: Status, Genre, and the Representation of Rebel­ lion,” Learning to Curse (New York: Routledge, 1990) 110. 33Puttenham 208. 34Puttenham 180. 35 Ambition and Privilege: The Social Tropes of Elizabethan Courtesy Theory (Ber­ keley: U of California P, 1984) 2. See also Derek Attridge, “Puttenham’s Per­ plexity: Nature, Art, and the Supplement in Renaissance Poetic Theory,” Lit­ erary Theory/Renaissance Texts, eds. Patricia Parker and David Quint (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1986) 257-79. 36 See Rebhorn 105-06. 37 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png English Language Notes Duke University Press

Vocal Register in Behn's Love-Letters between a Nobleman and His Sister

English Language Notes , Volume 41 (1) – Sep 1, 2003

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Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Regents of the University of Colorado
ISSN
0013-8282
eISSN
2573-3575
DOI
10.1215/00138282-41.1.44
Publisher site
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Abstract

English Language Notes 29 Poverty and Deviance in Early Modem Europe (Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1994) 9. “See Weimann 240. Also see Rackin 216. 31 See Michael D. Bristol, Carnival and Theater: Plebeian Culture and the Struc­ ture of Authority in Renaissance England (New York: Methuen, 1985) 88-103. William C. Carroll, Fat King, Lean Beggar: Representations of Poverty in the Age of Shakespeare (Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1996) 156; and also by Carroll, “Language, Politics, and Poverty in Shakespearian Drama,” Shakespeare Survey 44 (1992): 19-21. Also see Rackin 207-08. For an excellent discussion of critical responses to Shakespeare’s Cade, see Caldwell, 67-70. It is interesting to note that both Tillyardians and New Historicists evaluate Shakespeare’s position in 2 Henry VI as anti-populist. 32 “Murdering Peasants: Status, Genre, and the Representation of Rebel­ lion,” Learning to Curse (New York: Routledge, 1990) 110. 33Puttenham 208. 34Puttenham 180. 35 Ambition and Privilege: The Social Tropes of Elizabethan Courtesy Theory (Ber­ keley: U of California P, 1984) 2. See also Derek Attridge, “Puttenham’s Per­ plexity: Nature, Art, and the Supplement in Renaissance Poetic Theory,” Lit­ erary Theory/Renaissance Texts, eds. Patricia Parker and David Quint (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1986) 257-79. 36 See Rebhorn 105-06. 37

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English Language NotesDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2003

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