Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Understanding Rock: Essays in Musical Analysis Edited by John Covach and Graeme M. Boone New York: Oxford University Press, 1997 xiii, 219 pp.

Understanding Rock: Essays in Musical Analysis Edited by John Covach and Graeme M. Boone New... Daniel Harrison’s chapter on the music of the Beach Boys takes an even more unusual subset of the rock repertory: the “experimental” songs of the group’s Smile period. Like Covach, he situates this obscure music (unknown to many casual rock listeners) within the larger context of the Beach Boys’ previous music, discussing such compositionally self-conscious “baby steps” as “The Warmth of the Sun” and “God Only Knows” as a springboard to the 1966–67 experiments. Harrison also explores the role of the studio as a compositional tool in Brian Wilson’s music; this point is also made in Covach’s chapter but is addressed more thoroughly here. (Technology, timbre, and studio production are of course aspects of popular music that are largely tangential to art-music analysis but are crucial to much rock music; nevertheless one might also consider the role of 496 studio production techniques in Walter Legge’s recordings of Wagner’s Ring operas, as well as Philip Glass’ Satyagraha, recorded with rockstyle overdubbing.) Overall, this chapter is situated neatly between music theory and musicology, and makes for fascinating reading. Walter Everett brings a Schenkerian-derived approach to another overlooked repertoire: the intensely chromatic songs of Paul Simon’s 1970s solo career, before 1986’s http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

Understanding Rock: Essays in Musical Analysis Edited by John Covach and Graeme M. Boone New York: Oxford University Press, 1997 xiii, 219 pp.

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 44 (2) – Jan 1, 2000

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/understanding-rock-essays-in-musical-analysis-edited-by-john-covach-DG0Z60P1Mn
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by Yale University
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-44-2-495
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Daniel Harrison’s chapter on the music of the Beach Boys takes an even more unusual subset of the rock repertory: the “experimental” songs of the group’s Smile period. Like Covach, he situates this obscure music (unknown to many casual rock listeners) within the larger context of the Beach Boys’ previous music, discussing such compositionally self-conscious “baby steps” as “The Warmth of the Sun” and “God Only Knows” as a springboard to the 1966–67 experiments. Harrison also explores the role of the studio as a compositional tool in Brian Wilson’s music; this point is also made in Covach’s chapter but is addressed more thoroughly here. (Technology, timbre, and studio production are of course aspects of popular music that are largely tangential to art-music analysis but are crucial to much rock music; nevertheless one might also consider the role of 496 studio production techniques in Walter Legge’s recordings of Wagner’s Ring operas, as well as Philip Glass’ Satyagraha, recorded with rockstyle overdubbing.) Overall, this chapter is situated neatly between music theory and musicology, and makes for fascinating reading. Walter Everett brings a Schenkerian-derived approach to another overlooked repertoire: the intensely chromatic songs of Paul Simon’s 1970s solo career, before 1986’s

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2000

There are no references for this article.