Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Traditio Iohannis Hollandrini

Traditio Iohannis Hollandrini The three volumes under review here would normally not get much notice from most music theorists. And who could blame us? Editions of medieval music theory are not exactly bestsellers in our discipline. Even then, Johannes Hollandrinus is not a name that we would have likely ever encountered in our seminar readings. A quick leafing through these volumes might add to our suspicions, filled as they are with 1200 pages of dense Latin text accompanied by a fearsome arsenal of codicological tools--commentary, critical notes, manuscript sigla, tables of concordances and variants, and so forth--and almost all of it in German. (And be forewarned: another five volumes are planned in this series.) Surely such a scholarly study could be of interest only to the most specialized and battle-hardened historian of medieval music theory. As I hope to persuade in this review, that assumption is mistaken. To be sure, there are good reasons that Hollandrinus has remained a rather obscure figure until now. Although his name did pop up in a few manuscripts known to scholars in the early twentieth century as a "Magister" of chant pedagogy, we knew nothing of the person. Hugo Riemann wrongly assumed that Hollandrinus was http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

Traditio Iohannis Hollandrini

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 57 (2) – Sep 21, 2013

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/traditio-iohannis-hollandrini-YqfG0c6nj5

References (8)

Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Duke Univ Press
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-2323506
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The three volumes under review here would normally not get much notice from most music theorists. And who could blame us? Editions of medieval music theory are not exactly bestsellers in our discipline. Even then, Johannes Hollandrinus is not a name that we would have likely ever encountered in our seminar readings. A quick leafing through these volumes might add to our suspicions, filled as they are with 1200 pages of dense Latin text accompanied by a fearsome arsenal of codicological tools--commentary, critical notes, manuscript sigla, tables of concordances and variants, and so forth--and almost all of it in German. (And be forewarned: another five volumes are planned in this series.) Surely such a scholarly study could be of interest only to the most specialized and battle-hardened historian of medieval music theory. As I hope to persuade in this review, that assumption is mistaken. To be sure, there are good reasons that Hollandrinus has remained a rather obscure figure until now. Although his name did pop up in a few manuscripts known to scholars in the early twentieth century as a "Magister" of chant pedagogy, we knew nothing of the person. Hugo Riemann wrongly assumed that Hollandrinus was

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Sep 21, 2013

There are no references for this article.