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Three Generations

Three Generations 184 The Journal of Korean Studies sources (especially those that are not literary translations) is unfortunately small, and the implicit overarching narrative of this literary history demon­ strates little sympathy for or familiarity with recent developments in literary studies, regardless of their merit. An approach to literary history lacking sustained critical engagement with salient concerns and synchronic issues that structure literary and critical studies in many other national literary fields-Japanese, Chinese, and non-Asian-is inherently limited, but this clarifies what steps the field takes next. In addition to questions raised by this important volume, other questions-of hegemony and representation, subjectivity and governmentality, gender and performance, aesthetics and politics, and ideology critique, to name a few-await. The grow­ ing cohort of recent Korean literature scholars and teachers now has both a valuable reference work and a clearer mapping of where to go from here. REVIEWED BY SCOTT SW ANER UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Three Generations by Yorn Sang-seop. Translated by Yu Young­ nan. Afterword by Kim Chie-sou. Brooklyn: Archipelago Books, 2005. 476 pp. $1 9. 80 (cloth). Yorn Sang-seop (throughout this review I follow the romaniz ation used in Yu Young -nan's translation) is one of the most prominent writers of twentieth­ http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Korean Studies Duke University Press

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Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by the Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York
ISSN
0731-1613
eISSN
2158-1665
DOI
10.1353/jks.2005.0003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

184 The Journal of Korean Studies sources (especially those that are not literary translations) is unfortunately small, and the implicit overarching narrative of this literary history demon­ strates little sympathy for or familiarity with recent developments in literary studies, regardless of their merit. An approach to literary history lacking sustained critical engagement with salient concerns and synchronic issues that structure literary and critical studies in many other national literary fields-Japanese, Chinese, and non-Asian-is inherently limited, but this clarifies what steps the field takes next. In addition to questions raised by this important volume, other questions-of hegemony and representation, subjectivity and governmentality, gender and performance, aesthetics and politics, and ideology critique, to name a few-await. The grow­ ing cohort of recent Korean literature scholars and teachers now has both a valuable reference work and a clearer mapping of where to go from here. REVIEWED BY SCOTT SW ANER UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Three Generations by Yorn Sang-seop. Translated by Yu Young­ nan. Afterword by Kim Chie-sou. Brooklyn: Archipelago Books, 2005. 476 pp. $1 9. 80 (cloth). Yorn Sang-seop (throughout this review I follow the romaniz ation used in Yu Young -nan's translation) is one of the most prominent writers of twentieth­

Journal

Journal of Korean StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2005

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