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Thomas Dekker's Use of Kyd's The Spanish Tragedy in Satiromastix

Thomas Dekker's Use of Kyd's The Spanish Tragedy in Satiromastix September 2003 7 OED first cites the simple words from Spenser and Stanyhurst respectively. Unless further research antedates the citations, those forms seem most likely to be back-formations. THOMAS DEKKER’S USE OF KYD’S THE SPANISH TRAGEDYIN SATIROMASTIX Thomas Kyd’s The Spanish Tragedy, which was one of the most popular Elizabethan plays, initiated and stongly influenced the revenge tragedy genre. It also became, as Boas, Freeman, and Dudrap have demonstrated, the most cited, parodied, and imi­ tated play in the Jacobean and Caroline periods.1 Similarly, Robert Knapp has stated that The Spanish Tragedy exerted “a compulsive force . . . which ran to . . . innumerable partial imi­ tations . . . while simultaneously inspiring scorn and parody.”2 On the one hand, Kyd’s play was perceived as a monument of grandguignoland rhetorical and sentimental excesses. Its highly ornate language was parodied byjonson, Dekker, and Greene, among others, and Hieronimo became a favorite character whose impassioned speeches and excessive violence were cel­ ebrated and ridiculed. But, on the other hand, The Spanish Trag­ edy also served for Kyd’s contemporaries and successors as a re­ pository of revenge tragedy motifs and powerful psychological character delineations.3 In particular, Hieronimo’s revenge play­ let, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png English Language Notes Duke University Press

Thomas Dekker's Use of Kyd's The Spanish Tragedy in Satiromastix

English Language Notes , Volume 41 (1) – Sep 1, 2003

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Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Regents of the University of Colorado
ISSN
0013-8282
eISSN
2573-3575
DOI
10.1215/00138282-41.1.7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

September 2003 7 OED first cites the simple words from Spenser and Stanyhurst respectively. Unless further research antedates the citations, those forms seem most likely to be back-formations. THOMAS DEKKER’S USE OF KYD’S THE SPANISH TRAGEDYIN SATIROMASTIX Thomas Kyd’s The Spanish Tragedy, which was one of the most popular Elizabethan plays, initiated and stongly influenced the revenge tragedy genre. It also became, as Boas, Freeman, and Dudrap have demonstrated, the most cited, parodied, and imi­ tated play in the Jacobean and Caroline periods.1 Similarly, Robert Knapp has stated that The Spanish Tragedy exerted “a compulsive force . . . which ran to . . . innumerable partial imi­ tations . . . while simultaneously inspiring scorn and parody.”2 On the one hand, Kyd’s play was perceived as a monument of grandguignoland rhetorical and sentimental excesses. Its highly ornate language was parodied byjonson, Dekker, and Greene, among others, and Hieronimo became a favorite character whose impassioned speeches and excessive violence were cel­ ebrated and ridiculed. But, on the other hand, The Spanish Trag­ edy also served for Kyd’s contemporaries and successors as a re­ pository of revenge tragedy motifs and powerful psychological character delineations.3 In particular, Hieronimo’s revenge play­ let,

Journal

English Language NotesDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2003

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