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Thermon Ruth and the Selah Jubilee Singers An Interview

Thermon Ruth and the Selah Jubilee Singers An Interview Thermon Ruth and the Selah Jubilee Singers An Interview Christopher Lomell Introduction The spirited singing heard during Holiness-Pentecostal worship is one of the most distinctive features of black sacred music to develop over the past century. This spiritual music was also captured by commercial record companies as early as 1927. Rev. Leora Ross and the Church of the Living God Jubilee Singers (OKeh Records), the Texas Jubilee Singers (Columbia Records), and Memphis's Holy Ghost Sanctified Singers (Brunswick Records) were among the notable groups documented. The recorded selections of Rev. F. W McGee of Chicago, which typically consisted of a highly compressed sermon, a small vocal chorus, and a stringband, proved so popular that he was called into the studio of Victor Records on twelve occasions between 1927 and 1930. The jug band accompanying performances of Elder Richard Bryant, recorded in Memphis in 1928, were also among the early recordings which captured the sound of rural black Holiness music of the mid-South. Born in South Carolina and raised in New York City, Thermon Ruth was first exposed to Holiness-Pentecostalism about 1925 when his family joined St. Mark's Holy Church in Brooklyn. He soon became a member of the Selah Jubilee http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

Thermon Ruth and the Selah Jubilee Singers An Interview

Black Sacred Music , Volume 2 (2) – Sep 1, 1988

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Copyright
© Copyright 1988 JBSM/Jon Michael Spencer
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-2.2.29
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Thermon Ruth and the Selah Jubilee Singers An Interview Christopher Lomell Introduction The spirited singing heard during Holiness-Pentecostal worship is one of the most distinctive features of black sacred music to develop over the past century. This spiritual music was also captured by commercial record companies as early as 1927. Rev. Leora Ross and the Church of the Living God Jubilee Singers (OKeh Records), the Texas Jubilee Singers (Columbia Records), and Memphis's Holy Ghost Sanctified Singers (Brunswick Records) were among the notable groups documented. The recorded selections of Rev. F. W McGee of Chicago, which typically consisted of a highly compressed sermon, a small vocal chorus, and a stringband, proved so popular that he was called into the studio of Victor Records on twelve occasions between 1927 and 1930. The jug band accompanying performances of Elder Richard Bryant, recorded in Memphis in 1928, were also among the early recordings which captured the sound of rural black Holiness music of the mid-South. Born in South Carolina and raised in New York City, Thermon Ruth was first exposed to Holiness-Pentecostalism about 1925 when his family joined St. Mark's Holy Church in Brooklyn. He soon became a member of the Selah Jubilee

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1988

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