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THEORIZING THE CADENCE IN THE MUSIC OF MACHAUT

THEORIZING THE CADENCE IN THE MUSIC OF MACHAUT phrases join together to form a complete melody (a periodus). (Bower 1989, 136–37)1 The early twelfth-century writer Johannes Cotto makes clear in De Musica cum Tonario that these hierarchical categories in fact have very specific ramifications for pitch organization: What the grammarians call “colon,” “comma,” and “period” in prose, this in chant certain musicians call diastema, systema, and teleusis. Now diastema . . . occurs when the chant makes a suitable pause, not on the final but elsewhere; systema . . . [occurs] whenever a suitable pause in the melody comes on the final; and teleusis is the end of the chant. (Babb and Palisca 1978, 117)2 Just as language can be segmented into constituent parts arranged hierarchically, so too can melody. In a persuasive essay on the importance of large-scale melodic phrase structure in chant, Ritva Jonsson and Leo Treitler elaborate on this relationship: The most important analytical strategy for the Latin language is its segmentation into a hierarchy of sense-units called commas, colons, and periods. The composition and analysis of melodies follows the segmentation of language, establishing a phrase hierarchy articulated by the counterparts of the commas, colons, and periods, namely the cadential formulas and the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

THEORIZING THE CADENCE IN THE MUSIC OF MACHAUT

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 47 (2) – Jan 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Yale University
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-47-2-325
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

phrases join together to form a complete melody (a periodus). (Bower 1989, 136–37)1 The early twelfth-century writer Johannes Cotto makes clear in De Musica cum Tonario that these hierarchical categories in fact have very specific ramifications for pitch organization: What the grammarians call “colon,” “comma,” and “period” in prose, this in chant certain musicians call diastema, systema, and teleusis. Now diastema . . . occurs when the chant makes a suitable pause, not on the final but elsewhere; systema . . . [occurs] whenever a suitable pause in the melody comes on the final; and teleusis is the end of the chant. (Babb and Palisca 1978, 117)2 Just as language can be segmented into constituent parts arranged hierarchically, so too can melody. In a persuasive essay on the importance of large-scale melodic phrase structure in chant, Ritva Jonsson and Leo Treitler elaborate on this relationship: The most important analytical strategy for the Latin language is its segmentation into a hierarchy of sense-units called commas, colons, and periods. The composition and analysis of melodies follows the segmentation of language, establishing a phrase hierarchy articulated by the counterparts of the commas, colons, and periods, namely the cadential formulas and the

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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