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Theology in the Hip-Hop of Public Enemy and Kool Moe Dee

Theology in the Hip-Hop of Public Enemy and Kool Moe Dee Theology in the Hip-Hop ol Pub/it Enemy and Koo/Moe Dee Angela Spence Nelson The racial oppression of black people in many ways has fueled and shaped black musical forms in America. One example is the blues, which originated in the rural South among poor, uneducated black men. In the North, the music became more formalized, and singers such as Gertrude "Ma" Rainey, Bessie Smith, Mamie Smith, Ida Cox, and Sarah Martin became known as the queens of the "classic blues ." kindred musical genre is jazz, which was largely based on the twelve-bar blues harmonic structure and phrasing. It was more "po­ lished" than the earlier New Orleans jazz at the turn of the century, and its major influences came from New York City, Chicago, and Kansas City. Finally, on the religious front, gospel music was in its early stages of development around the time early blues was evolv­ ing. Influenced by blues and jazz as early as the thirties, gospel was revolutionary (and controversial) in its combination of drums and fast, rocking rhythms. As evidenced in the blues, jazz, and gospel of the twenties and thirties, black musicians borrowed heavily from other black musical forms to (re)create new http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

Theology in the Hip-Hop of Public Enemy and Kool Moe Dee

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Copyright
Copyright © 1991 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-5.1.51
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Theology in the Hip-Hop ol Pub/it Enemy and Koo/Moe Dee Angela Spence Nelson The racial oppression of black people in many ways has fueled and shaped black musical forms in America. One example is the blues, which originated in the rural South among poor, uneducated black men. In the North, the music became more formalized, and singers such as Gertrude "Ma" Rainey, Bessie Smith, Mamie Smith, Ida Cox, and Sarah Martin became known as the queens of the "classic blues ." kindred musical genre is jazz, which was largely based on the twelve-bar blues harmonic structure and phrasing. It was more "po­ lished" than the earlier New Orleans jazz at the turn of the century, and its major influences came from New York City, Chicago, and Kansas City. Finally, on the religious front, gospel music was in its early stages of development around the time early blues was evolv­ ing. Influenced by blues and jazz as early as the thirties, gospel was revolutionary (and controversial) in its combination of drums and fast, rocking rhythms. As evidenced in the blues, jazz, and gospel of the twenties and thirties, black musicians borrowed heavily from other black musical forms to (re)create new

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 1991

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