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THE WOMAN WITH THE PEARL NECKLACE

THE WOMAN WITH THE PEARL NECKLACE almost Vermeer’s, without rejoicing that I can see her there. To find her in the Met show gave me a moment of peace, and I stood for a long time before her upraised arms, her earnest innocent look, and the Vermeer light that pours over her. For a moment the crowds fell away. When I returned home, I mentioned to my husband what I had enjoyed most about the exhibit and then turned to other pressing matters. My brief report to him is important because it confirms what I saw. Two weeks later, on a Saturday morning, I got up early, having decided to be at the Met when it opened. I wanted to go immediately to the end of the exhibit (as I often do) and work my way back against the crowd to see more of the paintings in peace. I was less tired; it was the weekend; the crowds lined up on the steps outside the Met were there to see the dresses of “Jackie O,” not Vermeer. I could anticipate leisurely viewing. But The Woman with the Pearl Necklace was not there. Slowly I turned back through the exhibit, looking. I counted the Vermeers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Common Knowledge Duke University Press

THE WOMAN WITH THE PEARL NECKLACE

Common Knowledge , Volume 8 (2) – Apr 1, 2002

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0961-754X
eISSN
1538-4578
DOI
10.1215/0961754X-8-2-280
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

almost Vermeer’s, without rejoicing that I can see her there. To find her in the Met show gave me a moment of peace, and I stood for a long time before her upraised arms, her earnest innocent look, and the Vermeer light that pours over her. For a moment the crowds fell away. When I returned home, I mentioned to my husband what I had enjoyed most about the exhibit and then turned to other pressing matters. My brief report to him is important because it confirms what I saw. Two weeks later, on a Saturday morning, I got up early, having decided to be at the Met when it opened. I wanted to go immediately to the end of the exhibit (as I often do) and work my way back against the crowd to see more of the paintings in peace. I was less tired; it was the weekend; the crowds lined up on the steps outside the Met were there to see the dresses of “Jackie O,” not Vermeer. I could anticipate leisurely viewing. But The Woman with the Pearl Necklace was not there. Slowly I turned back through the exhibit, looking. I counted the Vermeers.

Journal

Common KnowledgeDuke University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2002

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