Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Type 2 Sonata in the Nineteenth CenturyTwo Case Studies from Mendelssohn and Dvořák

The Type 2 Sonata in the Nineteenth CenturyTwo Case Studies from Mendelssohn and Dvořák This article explores musical and theoretical issues raised by a particular type of parallel form that has been interpreted in two strikingly contradictory ways—either as a birotational type 2 sonata form or as a sonata form with a reversed recapitulation. Insights drawn from Hepokoski and Darcy’s sonata theory, Caplin’s theory of formal functions, and Schenkerian concepts of tonal content argue in favor of a type 2 interpretation of nineteenth-century manifestations. The analyses presented demonstrate some of the ways these theories may prove mutually reinforcing, even when they marshal different criteria and model out-of-phase relationships between, say, formal boundaries and Schenkerian tonal pillars. Throughout, the emphasis is on dynamic interactions between a type 2 movement’s generic formal characteristics and its compositional idiosyncrasies. Two movements distinguished by their supple form-content synergies serve as case studies: the Andante from Mendelssohn’s octet for strings in E♭ major, op. 20, and the first movement from Dvořák’s string quartet in E♭ major, op. 51. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

The Type 2 Sonata in the Nineteenth CenturyTwo Case Studies from Mendelssohn and Dvořák

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 63 (1) – Apr 1, 2019

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/the-type-2-sonata-in-the-nineteenth-centurytwo-case-studies-from-zNb8o8ywuL
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 by Yale University
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-7320486
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article explores musical and theoretical issues raised by a particular type of parallel form that has been interpreted in two strikingly contradictory ways—either as a birotational type 2 sonata form or as a sonata form with a reversed recapitulation. Insights drawn from Hepokoski and Darcy’s sonata theory, Caplin’s theory of formal functions, and Schenkerian concepts of tonal content argue in favor of a type 2 interpretation of nineteenth-century manifestations. The analyses presented demonstrate some of the ways these theories may prove mutually reinforcing, even when they marshal different criteria and model out-of-phase relationships between, say, formal boundaries and Schenkerian tonal pillars. Throughout, the emphasis is on dynamic interactions between a type 2 movement’s generic formal characteristics and its compositional idiosyncrasies. Two movements distinguished by their supple form-content synergies serve as case studies: the Andante from Mendelssohn’s octet for strings in E♭ major, op. 20, and the first movement from Dvořák’s string quartet in E♭ major, op. 51.

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2019

References