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The Theology of the Songs of the Southern Slave

The Theology of the Songs of the Southern Slave Henry Hugh Proctor This essay was Rev. Henry Hugh Proctor's (1868-1933) Bachelor of Divinity degree thesis at Yale School of Divinity in 1894. Having received his under­ graduate training at Fisk University (B.A., 1891 }, the young Proctor now appeared eager to apply his newly acquired theological learning to an exam­ ination of the spiritual. While numerous essays on the slave songs preceeded his, this is seemingly the earliest published article by a credentialed black theologian. Moreover. having written it following seminary training at such a strong theological academy, the article is a mature piece of scholarship standing first in the chronology of similar writings by theologians Howard Thurman and James Cone. That Proctor would leave Yale to assume an ecclesial position as pastor of the prominent First Congregational Church in Atlanta ( 1894-1920). is perhaps foreseen in the manner by which his essay also "preaches" well. It is an elegant piece of scholarship.' When the Southern slave came forth from the house of bondage it was with a song in his mouth. It was the triumphant note of that ancestral strain which, caught up from sire to son and from matron to maid, found its long expected fulfillment http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

The Theology of the Songs of the Southern Slave

Black Sacred Music , Volume 2 (1) – Mar 1, 1988

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Copyright
© Copyright 1988 JBSM/Jon Michael Spencer
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-2.1.51
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Henry Hugh Proctor This essay was Rev. Henry Hugh Proctor's (1868-1933) Bachelor of Divinity degree thesis at Yale School of Divinity in 1894. Having received his under­ graduate training at Fisk University (B.A., 1891 }, the young Proctor now appeared eager to apply his newly acquired theological learning to an exam­ ination of the spiritual. While numerous essays on the slave songs preceeded his, this is seemingly the earliest published article by a credentialed black theologian. Moreover. having written it following seminary training at such a strong theological academy, the article is a mature piece of scholarship standing first in the chronology of similar writings by theologians Howard Thurman and James Cone. That Proctor would leave Yale to assume an ecclesial position as pastor of the prominent First Congregational Church in Atlanta ( 1894-1920). is perhaps foreseen in the manner by which his essay also "preaches" well. It is an elegant piece of scholarship.' When the Southern slave came forth from the house of bondage it was with a song in his mouth. It was the triumphant note of that ancestral strain which, caught up from sire to son and from matron to maid, found its long expected fulfillment

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 1988

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