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The Theology of Black Power and Black Song: James Brown

The Theology of Black Power and Black Song: James Brown ffte Theology ol B/11,k Power and B/11,k Song: Jomes Brown Earlston E. DeSilva James Brown is an Afro-American performing artist and soul singer who reigned as "Soul Brother No. 1" during the sixties and seventies, and whose two decades at the top of the pop music charts allow him even today to be hailed as the "Godfather of Soul." The present concern is the period of his career when the revolutionary ethos of Black Power served as the critical point of departure for his reli­ giously inspired and theologically imbued messages of black libera­ tion and black pride. His "Say It Loud-I'm Black and I'm Proud" (1968), "(Call Me) Superbad" (1970), and "Soul Power" (1971) are today among the cultural artifacts of the black revolution. During the late sixties and early seventies, Black Power had be­ come the prevailing ethos in the effort to instill racial consciousness and pride in the souls of black folk. Martin Luther King, Jr., had inspired millions of black Americans to get up from their knees and march against social injustice. Stokely Carmichael and Floyd McKis­ sick had propagated "Black Power," and Black Muslim Malcolm X had proclaimed an unforgiving black nationalism. This is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

The Theology of Black Power and Black Song: James Brown

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Copyright
Copyright © 1989 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-3.2.57
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ffte Theology ol B/11,k Power and B/11,k Song: Jomes Brown Earlston E. DeSilva James Brown is an Afro-American performing artist and soul singer who reigned as "Soul Brother No. 1" during the sixties and seventies, and whose two decades at the top of the pop music charts allow him even today to be hailed as the "Godfather of Soul." The present concern is the period of his career when the revolutionary ethos of Black Power served as the critical point of departure for his reli­ giously inspired and theologically imbued messages of black libera­ tion and black pride. His "Say It Loud-I'm Black and I'm Proud" (1968), "(Call Me) Superbad" (1970), and "Soul Power" (1971) are today among the cultural artifacts of the black revolution. During the late sixties and early seventies, Black Power had be­ come the prevailing ethos in the effort to instill racial consciousness and pride in the souls of black folk. Martin Luther King, Jr., had inspired millions of black Americans to get up from their knees and march against social injustice. Stokely Carmichael and Floyd McKis­ sick had propagated "Black Power," and Black Muslim Malcolm X had proclaimed an unforgiving black nationalism. This is

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1989

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