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The “Salt-fish” Crux in The Merry Wives of Windsor

The “Salt-fish” Crux in The Merry Wives of Windsor English L an g u ag e N otes V olum e X LII ♦ N u m b e r 3 ♦ M arch 2005 T H E “SALT-FISH” CRUX IN TH E M E R R Y WIVES OF WINDSOR Slender . . . they [Shallow’s “successors” an d “A ncestors”] may giue the dozen white Luces in th e ir Coate. Shallow It is an olde Coate. Evans T h e dozen white Lowses doe b ecom e an old Coat well: it agrees well passant: It is a familiar beast to m an, a n d signifies Loue. Shallow The Luse is the fresh-fish, the salt-fish, is an old Coate,1 Shallow’s “T h e Luse is the fresh-fish, the salt-fish, is an old C oate” in the o p en in g scene o f The Merry Wives of Windsor has long ranked am ong th e m ost perplexing Shakespearean cruxes. After Hamlet's “dram o f eale” it may well be the one th a t has inspired least consensus am o n g com m entators. Over thirty dis­ tinct explanations o r solutions have b een proposed, yet n o n e http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png English Language Notes Duke University Press

The “Salt-fish” Crux in The Merry Wives of Windsor

English Language Notes , Volume 42 (3) – Mar 1, 2005

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Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Regents of the University of Colorado
ISSN
0013-8282
eISSN
2573-3575
DOI
10.1215/00138282-42.3.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

English L an g u ag e N otes V olum e X LII ♦ N u m b e r 3 ♦ M arch 2005 T H E “SALT-FISH” CRUX IN TH E M E R R Y WIVES OF WINDSOR Slender . . . they [Shallow’s “successors” an d “A ncestors”] may giue the dozen white Luces in th e ir Coate. Shallow It is an olde Coate. Evans T h e dozen white Lowses doe b ecom e an old Coat well: it agrees well passant: It is a familiar beast to m an, a n d signifies Loue. Shallow The Luse is the fresh-fish, the salt-fish, is an old Coate,1 Shallow’s “T h e Luse is the fresh-fish, the salt-fish, is an old C oate” in the o p en in g scene o f The Merry Wives of Windsor has long ranked am ong th e m ost perplexing Shakespearean cruxes. After Hamlet's “dram o f eale” it may well be the one th a t has inspired least consensus am o n g com m entators. Over thirty dis­ tinct explanations o r solutions have b een proposed, yet n o n e

Journal

English Language NotesDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2005

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