Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Rhetoric of Poverty and the Poverty of Rhetoric: Shakespeare's Jack Cade and the Early Modern Rhetoric Manual

The Rhetoric of Poverty and the Poverty of Rhetoric: Shakespeare's Jack Cade and the Early Modern... 32 English Language Notes once Zenocrate’s privilege is removed, Tamburlaine’s “cruelty is untempered” (21). 19 Henry’s change of posture at the end of that play is startling, as he is the same man who had earlier declared “No king of England if not King of France!” (II.ii.193). 20 Bartels, “The Double Vision of the East: Imperialist Self-Construction in Marlowe’s Tamburlaine, Part One," Renaissance Drama 23 (1992) 3-24, 21. 21 Gayle Rubin, “The Traffic in Women: Notes on the ‘Political Economy’ of Sex,” Toward an Anthropology of Women, ed. Rayna R. Reiter (New York: Monthly Review P, 1975) 157-210, 179, 180. 22 For disagreement, see Sara Munson Deats, Sex, Gender, and Desire in the Plays of Christopher Marlowe, who reads Zenocrate as a Venus figure who suc­ cessfully disarms Mars (Tamburlaine), and that “suffering transforms Zeno­ crate into the stereotypic compassionate woman seeking to mitigate the bel­ ligerence of the militant male” (145). 23 Ian Gaskell, “2 Tamburlainer. Marlowe’s War Against God,” English Studies in Canada 11.2 (June 1985) 178-92, 178. 24 Burnett, “Tamburlaine: An Elizabethan Vagabond,” Studies in Philology 84.3 (1987) 308-23, 322. THE RHETORIC OF POVERTY AND THE POVERTY OF RHETORIC: SHAKESPEARE’S JACK CADE AND THE EARLY MODERN http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png English Language Notes Duke University Press

The Rhetoric of Poverty and the Poverty of Rhetoric: Shakespeare's Jack Cade and the Early Modern Rhetoric Manual

English Language Notes , Volume 41 (1) – Sep 1, 2003

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/the-rhetoric-of-poverty-and-the-poverty-of-rhetoric-shakespeare-s-jack-qSDfX6X1gs
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Regents of the University of Colorado
ISSN
0013-8282
eISSN
2573-3575
DOI
10.1215/00138282-41.1.32
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

32 English Language Notes once Zenocrate’s privilege is removed, Tamburlaine’s “cruelty is untempered” (21). 19 Henry’s change of posture at the end of that play is startling, as he is the same man who had earlier declared “No king of England if not King of France!” (II.ii.193). 20 Bartels, “The Double Vision of the East: Imperialist Self-Construction in Marlowe’s Tamburlaine, Part One," Renaissance Drama 23 (1992) 3-24, 21. 21 Gayle Rubin, “The Traffic in Women: Notes on the ‘Political Economy’ of Sex,” Toward an Anthropology of Women, ed. Rayna R. Reiter (New York: Monthly Review P, 1975) 157-210, 179, 180. 22 For disagreement, see Sara Munson Deats, Sex, Gender, and Desire in the Plays of Christopher Marlowe, who reads Zenocrate as a Venus figure who suc­ cessfully disarms Mars (Tamburlaine), and that “suffering transforms Zeno­ crate into the stereotypic compassionate woman seeking to mitigate the bel­ ligerence of the militant male” (145). 23 Ian Gaskell, “2 Tamburlainer. Marlowe’s War Against God,” English Studies in Canada 11.2 (June 1985) 178-92, 178. 24 Burnett, “Tamburlaine: An Elizabethan Vagabond,” Studies in Philology 84.3 (1987) 308-23, 322. THE RHETORIC OF POVERTY AND THE POVERTY OF RHETORIC: SHAKESPEARE’S JACK CADE AND THE EARLY MODERN

Journal

English Language NotesDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2003

There are no references for this article.