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The Race to Truth: Disarticulating Critical Thinking from Whiteliness

The Race to Truth: Disarticulating Critical Thinking from Whiteliness The Race to Truth: Disarticulating Critical Thinking from Whiteliness Catherine Fox Language is as real, as tangible in our lives as streets, pipelines, telephone switchboards, microwaves, radioactivity, cloning laboratories, nuclear power stations . . . but as long as our language is inadequate, our vision remains formless, our thinking and feeling are still running in old cycles, our process may be “revolutionary” but not transformative. —Adrienne Rich (1979: 247 – 48) Leading intellectuals tend to assume responsibility for imagining alternatives and do so within a set of discourses and institutions burdened genealogically by multifaceted complicities with power that make them dangerous to people. As agencies of these discourses that greatly affect the lives of people one might say leading intellectuals are a tool of oppression and most so precisely when they arrogate the right and power to judge and imagine efficacious alternatives — a process that we might suspect, sustains leading intellectuals at the expense of others. — Paul Bové (1986: 227) Within the academic nervous system, scholarly activity remains the primary source of our cultural capital. Critical analysis of oversights in the work of others remains more lucrative than critical reflections on similar oversights in one’s own work, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pedagogy Duke University Press

The Race to Truth: Disarticulating Critical Thinking from Whiteliness

Pedagogy , Volume 2 (2) – Apr 1, 2002

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Copyright
© 2002 Duke University Press
ISSN
1531-4200
eISSN
1533-6255
DOI
10.1215/15314200-2-2-197
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Race to Truth: Disarticulating Critical Thinking from Whiteliness Catherine Fox Language is as real, as tangible in our lives as streets, pipelines, telephone switchboards, microwaves, radioactivity, cloning laboratories, nuclear power stations . . . but as long as our language is inadequate, our vision remains formless, our thinking and feeling are still running in old cycles, our process may be “revolutionary” but not transformative. —Adrienne Rich (1979: 247 – 48) Leading intellectuals tend to assume responsibility for imagining alternatives and do so within a set of discourses and institutions burdened genealogically by multifaceted complicities with power that make them dangerous to people. As agencies of these discourses that greatly affect the lives of people one might say leading intellectuals are a tool of oppression and most so precisely when they arrogate the right and power to judge and imagine efficacious alternatives — a process that we might suspect, sustains leading intellectuals at the expense of others. — Paul Bové (1986: 227) Within the academic nervous system, scholarly activity remains the primary source of our cultural capital. Critical analysis of oversights in the work of others remains more lucrative than critical reflections on similar oversights in one’s own work,

Journal

PedagogyDuke University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2002

References