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The "Problem of Immigration" from a Child's Point of View: The Poetics of Abjection in Albert Swissa's Aqud and Farida Belghoul's Georgette!

The "Problem of Immigration" from a Child's Point of View: The Poetics of Abjection in Albert... OST CHILDREN: ROAMING THE STREETS aimlessly, escaping home and school, straying through unfamiliar places, haunted by appalling images of being contaminated, mutilated, chopped, and devoured, or of themselves polluting, torturing, humiliating, and devouring, fill the pages of both Albert Swissa’s Aqud (Israel, 1990) and Farida Belghoul’s Georgette! (France, 1986).2 1 While Leon Roudiez, the translator of Powers of Horror, keeps Kristeva’s use of the Latin deject to refer to people who have been rendered abject, John Lechte’s translation of the first chapter, “Approaching Abjection,” replaces deject with “outcast” and later again with “excluded” (130). From here onward I will use the terms outcast or abject-being in reference to those who are abjected. All Kristeva quotes are from Roudiez’s translation of Pouvoirs de l’horreur (Powers of Horror ). 2 Neither Belghoul’s nor Swissa’s novel has been translated into English. All translations from both novels (written in French and Hebrew, respectively) are mine. Citations of the original are provided for Belghoul’s novel, while for Swissa’s novel I have, at times, included the original in transliteration in order to give readers of Hebrew a better sense of the text’s distinctive linguistic quality, particularly its mixture of various “mismatched” linguistic registers, including http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Duke University Press

The "Problem of Immigration" from a Child's Point of View: The Poetics of Abjection in Albert Swissa's Aqud and Farida Belghoul's Georgette!

Comparative Literature , Volume 57 (2) – Jan 1, 2005

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2005 by University of Oregon
ISSN
0010-4124
eISSN
1945-8517
DOI
10.1215/-57-2-158
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

OST CHILDREN: ROAMING THE STREETS aimlessly, escaping home and school, straying through unfamiliar places, haunted by appalling images of being contaminated, mutilated, chopped, and devoured, or of themselves polluting, torturing, humiliating, and devouring, fill the pages of both Albert Swissa’s Aqud (Israel, 1990) and Farida Belghoul’s Georgette! (France, 1986).2 1 While Leon Roudiez, the translator of Powers of Horror, keeps Kristeva’s use of the Latin deject to refer to people who have been rendered abject, John Lechte’s translation of the first chapter, “Approaching Abjection,” replaces deject with “outcast” and later again with “excluded” (130). From here onward I will use the terms outcast or abject-being in reference to those who are abjected. All Kristeva quotes are from Roudiez’s translation of Pouvoirs de l’horreur (Powers of Horror ). 2 Neither Belghoul’s nor Swissa’s novel has been translated into English. All translations from both novels (written in French and Hebrew, respectively) are mine. Citations of the original are provided for Belghoul’s novel, while for Swissa’s novel I have, at times, included the original in transliteration in order to give readers of Hebrew a better sense of the text’s distinctive linguistic quality, particularly its mixture of various “mismatched” linguistic registers, including

Journal

Comparative LiteratureDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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