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THE PATH FROM TONIC TO DOMINANT IN THE SECOND MOVEMENT OF SCHUBERT'S STRING QUINTET AND IN CHOPIN'S FOURTH BALLADE

THE PATH FROM TONIC TO DOMINANT IN THE SECOND MOVEMENT OF SCHUBERT'S STRING QUINTET AND IN... £ believe that this is the case in the two pieces I shall examine in the present study. But should one suggest, in the first place, that motic associations must reflect only something characteristic of indidual pieces, as I have hinted at above? Could one not simply state that repetition of certain tone successions would suffice to create motic associations, no matter how common the succession is? One could then say that several similarly filled-in I–V motions or – – progressions, for example, would automatically create significant associations in a gen piece. Some recent studies have addressed this question. In his article “Schenker’s ‘Motic Parallelisms’” Charles Burkhart shows that in Chopin’s Nocturne, op. 15/2, a – – motion, supported by a bass arpeggiation I–V–I, can be found in the foreground in mm. 1–2 and in the middleground in mm. 1–16. Of this phenomenon Burkhart uses the term “Ursatz parallelism.” However, in his view such parallelism alone does not suffice to create significant motic associations. Yet genuine motic connections may arise if similar elaborations exist between different Ursatz replicas. Ursatz parallelism, since it is a structural concept, exceeds the definition of motic parallelism. It has at times been confused http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

THE PATH FROM TONIC TO DOMINANT IN THE SECOND MOVEMENT OF SCHUBERT'S STRING QUINTET AND IN CHOPIN'S FOURTH BALLADE

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 44 (2) – Jan 1, 2000

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by Yale University
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-44-2-451
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

£ believe that this is the case in the two pieces I shall examine in the present study. But should one suggest, in the first place, that motic associations must reflect only something characteristic of indidual pieces, as I have hinted at above? Could one not simply state that repetition of certain tone successions would suffice to create motic associations, no matter how common the succession is? One could then say that several similarly filled-in I–V motions or – – progressions, for example, would automatically create significant associations in a gen piece. Some recent studies have addressed this question. In his article “Schenker’s ‘Motic Parallelisms’” Charles Burkhart shows that in Chopin’s Nocturne, op. 15/2, a – – motion, supported by a bass arpeggiation I–V–I, can be found in the foreground in mm. 1–2 and in the middleground in mm. 1–16. Of this phenomenon Burkhart uses the term “Ursatz parallelism.” However, in his view such parallelism alone does not suffice to create significant motic associations. Yet genuine motic connections may arise if similar elaborations exist between different Ursatz replicas. Ursatz parallelism, since it is a structural concept, exceeds the definition of motic parallelism. It has at times been confused

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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