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THE PARADOX OF MUSICAL ANALYSIS

THE PARADOX OF MUSICAL ANALYSIS words in the that-clause (‘that bad music corrupts’) to characterize one of Plato’s belief states. A representation in words is used to characterize, to give the content of, a mental representation (much as with analysis and hearing). Plato’s belief makes things out to be a certain way, and the thatclause says how it makes things out to be. The that-clause characterizes Plato’s belief qua representation: it renders how the belief represents things as being.2 Belief attribution has received considerable philosophical attention in recent years (see essays in Woodfield 1982). Another example of giving the content is indirect quotation: “Plato said that bad music corrupts.” Plato did not, of course, use the words “bad music corrupts” since he didn’t speak English; but he did say something we can characterize and attribute to him using those words (and in this way we characterize some utterance of his).3 More generally: whenever we give the meaning of one expression via another, or say what a picture represents,4 or draw a picture to convey what we are thinking or feeling, that is the use of one representation to give the content of another. It is worth noting that the use of one representation http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

THE PARADOX OF MUSICAL ANALYSIS

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 43 (1) – Jan 1, 1999

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1999 by Yale University
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-43-1-83
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

words in the that-clause (‘that bad music corrupts’) to characterize one of Plato’s belief states. A representation in words is used to characterize, to give the content of, a mental representation (much as with analysis and hearing). Plato’s belief makes things out to be a certain way, and the thatclause says how it makes things out to be. The that-clause characterizes Plato’s belief qua representation: it renders how the belief represents things as being.2 Belief attribution has received considerable philosophical attention in recent years (see essays in Woodfield 1982). Another example of giving the content is indirect quotation: “Plato said that bad music corrupts.” Plato did not, of course, use the words “bad music corrupts” since he didn’t speak English; but he did say something we can characterize and attribute to him using those words (and in this way we characterize some utterance of his).3 More generally: whenever we give the meaning of one expression via another, or say what a picture represents,4 or draw a picture to convey what we are thinking or feeling, that is the use of one representation to give the content of another. It is worth noting that the use of one representation

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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