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The Oxford Handbook of Neo-Riemannian Music Theories

The Oxford Handbook of Neo-Riemannian Music Theories William Benjamin One of the odder features of this voluminous book is the fact that, of its twenty chapters, fourteen deal mainly with the work of Hugo Riemann. Only six of the twenty chapters take neo-Riemannian (NR) theory as a central topic, whether to expound, critique, extend, or apply it. To be sure, some of the authors take up the study of this or that text by Riemann for creative purposes, proposing new ways of looking at and using some aspect of his theory. Nevertheless, it is notable that the handbook of a contemporary branch of music theory would be, in large part, a history of theory text. What does this say? That there is only so much to be said, at this point, about the progeny, and that the progenitor's work is more suggestive? That the position of the derivative being secure, it is the unfounded neglect of the source theorist that needs address? Or that, despite important differences between them, Riemann's theories and their remake, initiated by David Lewin a hundred years later, are crucially linked, such that a full understanding of the latter requires more exploration of the former? Probably all of these, but it http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

The Oxford Handbook of Neo-Riemannian Music Theories

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 58 (2) – Sep 21, 2014

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Duke Univ Press
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-2781779
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

William Benjamin One of the odder features of this voluminous book is the fact that, of its twenty chapters, fourteen deal mainly with the work of Hugo Riemann. Only six of the twenty chapters take neo-Riemannian (NR) theory as a central topic, whether to expound, critique, extend, or apply it. To be sure, some of the authors take up the study of this or that text by Riemann for creative purposes, proposing new ways of looking at and using some aspect of his theory. Nevertheless, it is notable that the handbook of a contemporary branch of music theory would be, in large part, a history of theory text. What does this say? That there is only so much to be said, at this point, about the progeny, and that the progenitor's work is more suggestive? That the position of the derivative being secure, it is the unfounded neglect of the source theorist that needs address? Or that, despite important differences between them, Riemann's theories and their remake, initiated by David Lewin a hundred years later, are crucially linked, such that a full understanding of the latter requires more exploration of the former? Probably all of these, but it

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Sep 21, 2014

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